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Wed, Mar 03, 2010

Skyscanner Hears From Tall As Well As Overweight Flyers Following Survey

Tall Travellers Tired Of Extra Airlines Charges For Passengers That Don’t Fit The Norm

The UK’s tallest travellers have rallied in support of the world’s overweight passengers against so called ‘body discrimination’ by airlines.

Following the recent poll on travel site Skyscanner, where 76% of people voted in favor of a ‘Fat Tax’ being charged for passengers who cannot safely fit into a single seat, Skyscanner has been inundated with emails from Britain’s lofty air passengers, who have expressed solidarity with overweight travellers against ‘size discrimination’ by airlines.

Simon James, a 6' 5" tall man from Edinburgh said “Everyone’s talking about ‘fat tax’ but ‘tall tax’ has been around for years. I always request an exit row seat, but there’s no guarantee you’ll get one. On many cheap flights carriers, I have to pay for the privilege of choosing a seat or boarding first. I have sympathy for overweight people, but at least the vast majority of them can lose weight if they choose. Tall people can’t get any shorter. People come in all shapes and sizes, and airlines should accommodate us all.”

Barry Smith, Skyscanner co-founder and Development Director commented “There’s a fine line here between discrimination against any body type that is outside of a narrowing norm, and simple economic viability. The danger is that airlines will continue to squeeze us into ever shrinking seats, and charge all but the shortest, thinnest passengers a premium for extra room.”

Many airlines charge significant premiums for seats with extra leg room, for example Qantas charges an additional $160 on some flights for an exit seat. On flights to Sydney that are already expensive this could raise the cost prohibitively for some travellers.

Kevin Smith, famed American film director and actor, was the latest passenger to get involved in the airline ‘fat tax’ row after he was ejected from a Southwest Airlines flight after his bulk was deemed a ‘safety risk’.

FMI: www.skyscanner.net

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