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Sat, Apr 01, 2023

FAA NPRM Bans Petroleum-Based Aircraft in 2025

Admin says "Climate Emergency Forced Our Hand" in Going All Electric, Hydrogen

Special 04.01.23 Parody Edition: The FAA stunned industry stakeholders with a recent NPRM effectively banning all non-electric, non-hybrid engines from new production aircraft starting in 2025.

The change was proposed by an advisory body within the EPA, randomly sampled from a 3-square mile area in the Santa Monica, California area. According to the group, the only way to quantifiably halt ecological damage throughout the USA is to effectively ban the sale of petroleum-based engines with every new aircraft as soon as possible. 

Some pointed to the unusual composition of the advisory group, noting the areas' infamously hostile stance toward general aviation, but foreman Leslie Zant said they only chose what was best for the climate. "There's no reason everyone in my neighborhood can make an entire commute in their Tesla every day, but you can't fly a jet across the country on battery power. The only reason you people haven't switched to electric planes is because you just love the noise and the 'oooooh big engines are sooooo cool' shtick."

The FAA acknowledged the difficulty of producing electric aircraft at this point in time, but says the "serious climate emergency has forced the Administration's hand". With only a handful of even prototype hydrogen engines and flight-ready battery packs even in the developmental phase, the proposed rule could effectively create a moratorium on the manufacture of new aircraft. With 2 years to go, they believe there’s plenty of time to develop propulsion systems to remain within the law.

Zant did appeart somewhat considerate for the costly prospect of the NPRM, should it go through as written. “While the financial burden may be tough for traditional engine manufacturers, renewable energy grants, developmental loans, and other financial instruments should create a thriving alt-engine industry. Fast-tracked certification processes can result in renewable, sustainable aircraft in the skies in as little as one year.”

When asked if the move could create a titanic wave of demand for new manufacture engines, aircraft, and parts, Zant appeared to have misheard, asking the reporter "could you repeat that?" only to cut them off mid-sentence  each time, saying "Hmmm? What?" until glancing at the clock and making a hurried exit.

The FAA's proposed rule can be found at the link below. Comments are accepted through September 15th, 2023.

FMI: www.faa.gov

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