Army Special-Missions King Air 300 Surpasses 50,000 Flight Hours | Aero-News Network
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Fri, Jul 02, 2021

Army Special-Missions King Air 300 Surpasses 50,000 Flight Hours

Has Been In Service In The US Army Fleet Of Aircraft Since 2009

Textron is bragging about a Beechcraft King Air 300, delivered in 1987 and in service in the U.S. Army fleet of aircraft since 2009, that has surpassed a significant 50,000 flight hours milestone.

“The Beechcraft King Air is the world leader in twin-turboprop special mission operations because of the aircraft’s unmatched capabilities, ruggedness and reliability,” said Bob Gibbs, vice president, Special Mission Sales and Strategy for Textron Aviation.

“On behalf of our Textron Aviation employees who proudly sell, build, deliver and support the U.S. Army’s Beechcraft King Air fleet, it is our distinct privilege to congratulate them on this momentous milestone.”

The milestone King Air 300 is one of a larger fleet of Medium Altitude Reconnaissance and Surveillance System (MARSS) aircraft. MARSS aircraft are quick reaction capability assets supporting the U.S. Army’s requirement for aerial intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance. MARSS delivers imagery and signals intelligence data directly to the warfighter.

“The King Air Model 300 platform has been a solid performer,” stated Col. James DeBoer, project manager, U.S. Army Fixed Wing Project Office. “The aircraft was utilized heavily in CENTCOM to fill capability gaps over the past decade. An aircraft that was able to reach 50,000 flight hours, with more than 30,000 hours in mostly austere environments, deserves recognition as do the Soldiers who flew and maintained the aircraft, and those who stood at the ready to support its missions through parts replacement, repairs and other requirements.”

FMI: www.army.mil, www.txtav.com

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