NASA's Space Shuttle Discovery Set To Roll To Launch Pad | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Most Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

Airborne-Monday

Airborne-Tuesday

Airborne-Wednesday Airborne-Thursday

Airborne-Friday

Airborne On YouTube

Airborne-Unlimited-07.15.24

Airborne-NextGen-07.09.24

Airborne-Unlimited-07.10.24

Airborne-FlightTraining-07.11.24

Airborne-Unlimited-07.12.24

Sat, Apr 02, 2005

NASA's Space Shuttle Discovery Set To Roll To Launch Pad

Space Shuttle Discovery is set to roll out to Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Fla. First motion is currently targeted for 12:01 a.m. EDT Tuesday, April 5.

The fully-assembled Space Shuttle Vehicle, or "stack," -- consisting of the orbiter, External Tank (ET) and twin Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs) -- will be mounted on the Mobile Launcher Platform and delivered to the pad via a crawler transporter. The four-mile journey from the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) to the pad will take about six hours.

Discovery's initial move to Launch Pad 39B will be covered live on NASA Television. Live commentary will begin at the first motion of the crawler transporter and continue for about 30 minutes.

NASA TV is available via satellite in the continental U.S. on AMC-6, Transponder 9C, C-Band, at 72 degrees west longitude. The frequency is 3880.0 MHz. Polarization is vertical, and audio is monaural at 6.80 MHz. In Alaska and Hawaii, NASA TV is available on AMC-7, Transponder 18C, C-Band, at 137 degrees west longitude. The frequency is 4060.0 MHz. Polarization is vertical, and audio is monaural at 6.80 MHz. NASA TV is also available on the Internet at www.nasa.gov/ntv.

Launch of Discovery on its Return to Flight mission, designated STS-114, is targeted for May 15 with a launch window that extends to June 3.

During its 12-day mission, Discovery's seven-person crew will test new hardware and techniques to improve Shuttle safety, as well as deliver supplies to the International Space Station.

Discovery was moved from Orbiter Processing Facility on March 29 to the VAB and attached to its propulsion elements, a redesigned ET and twin SRBs.

In preparation for rollout to the launch pad, work in the VAB included the installation of a new digital camera, testing electrical and mechanical attachments between the orbiter and ET, and umbilical checks.

FMI: www.nasa.gov/returntoflight, www.nasa.gov/ntv

Advertisement

More News

Classic Aero-TV: Lightspeed Aviation’s Delta Zulu Headset

From 2023 (YouTube Version): Advent of the Age of Safety Wearables The paramountcy of a pilot’s headset to the safety and enjoyment of flight cannot be overstated. It is the >[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Linx (07.13.24)

Aero Linx: Planes of Fame Air Museum The story of the Planes of Fame Air Museum is the story of one man’s vision. Ed Maloney knew that protecting our aviation history was imp>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Term (07.13.24): Minimum Sector Altitude [ICAO]

Minimum Sector Altitude [ICAO] The lowest altitude which may be used under emergency conditions which will provide a minimum clearance of 300 m (1,000 feet) above all obstacles loc>[...]

Klyde Morris (07.12.24)

It's All A Matter of Attitude, Klyde FMI: www.klydemorris.com>[...]

Airborne 07.08.24: Polaris Dawn!, RCAF at Osh, “That’s All, Brother”

Also: Eco Aero-Vandalism, Simulated Mars, KC-46A Pegasus Record, USAF Warrant Officers Polaris Dawn is the first of the Polaris Program, a series of three planned space missions al>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2024 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC