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Sat, Mar 12, 2022

NTSB Prelim: Raytheon Aircraft Company Hawker 800XP

The Captain Reported, “The Yoke Did Not Have Any Air Resistance..."

Location: Aspen, CO Accident Number: CEN22LA130
Date & Time: February 21, 2022, 11:33 Local Registration: N99AP
Aircraft: Raytheon Aircraft Company Hawker 800XP Injuries: 6 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Business

On February 21, 2022, at 1133 mountain daylight time, a Raytheon Aircraft Company Hawker 800XP airplane, N99AP, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Aspen, Colorado. The two pilots and four passengers were not injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 business flight.

According to the Captain’s statement, before departure, the airplane and runway were clear of any contaminants, all pre-takeoff checks were normal, and the flaps were set to 15°. During the takeoff clearance for runway 33, the air traffic control tower reported the wind was from 160° at 16 knots, gusting to 25 knots, and the instantaneous wind was from 180° at 10 knots. The captain performed a static takeoff, and the first officer made all of the callouts; airspeed alive, 80 knots, V1, and rotate. At rotation speed, the captain applied back pressure on the yoke; however, the airplane would not become airborne. The captain reported, “the yoke did not have any air resistance or any pressure on it as we experience normally in Hawkers (the weight and pressure on the yoke felt the same as though the airplane was stationary on [the] ground).”

After a few seconds and without any indication the airplane would take off, the captain aborted the takeoff. The captain reduced the engines to idle, deployed the thrust reversers, and applied the brakes. The airplane subsequently departed the end of the runway into the snow. The captain secured the airplane and assisted in the evacuation of the passengers.

FMI: www.ntsb.gov

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