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Thu, Oct 06, 2022

Quiet Technology Aerospace HTF7000 STC Heading For NBAA-BACE

An End to Thrust-Reverser Door Corrosion

Based in Hollywood, Florida, Quiet Technology Aerospace (QTA) is an FAA approved Part 145 Repair Station that holds additional approval for Parts Manufacturing (PMA).

The company’s thirty-thousand-square-foot air-conditioned facility comprises a two-thousand-square-foot clean-room, two certified paint booths, curing ovens, refrigerated storage, a materials test laboratory, and the ancillary equipment required to support both aircraft repair services and the fabrication of new aircraft parts and components. Since 1998, Quiet Technology Aerospace has received 12 Supplemental Type Certificates (STC’s) for Hush Kits on large transport aircraft, military transports, and business aircraft.

2022’s NBAA Business Aviation Convention & Exhibition (NBAA-BACE) will see Quiet Technology Aerospace showcase its proprietary Permanent Solution to the recurring and costly problem of corrosion of the thrust-reverser doors and side-beam assemblies of  Honeywell’s HTF7000 engines. The HTF7000 is the 6,540 to 7,624-lbf mill by which Bombardier’s 300/350 Challenger, Gulfstream’s G280, Embraer’s Legacy 450/500, and Cessna’s Citation Longitude are powered.

QTA’s Permanent Solution to the HTF7000’s corrosion woes consists primarily of the company remanufacturing the engine’s thrust-reverser doors, replacing the aluminum in the corroded areas with new titanium parts, and protecting the reverser-assembly’s side-beams with a new titanium cap. STC approval of protocol and its constituent parts appears imminent.

Specifically, the STC toward which QTA is striving encompasses four airframe types: the Challenger 300/350; Gulfstream G280; Embraer Legacy 450/500; Embraer Praetor 500/600; and Cessna (Textron) Longitude.

The QTA thrust-reverser door corrosion Permanent Solution, when approved, will be covered by a lifetime structural warranty which is assigned to the recipient aircraft’s serial number and transferrable throughout the aircraft’s life.

While QTA does expect STC approval of its Permanent Solution prior to the end of 2022, the company offers an immediate, FAA approved interim life extension repair to operators disinclined or unable to wait to have their aircraft’s corroded thrust-reverser doors set right. The life extension applies even if an aircraft’s thrust-reverser doors or side-beams are beyond economical repair (BER). Parties opting for the life extension repair will earn significant credit toward the Permanent Solution—should they so choose.

Quiet Technology Aerospace CEO Barry Fine states: “Our approved repair solution to this relentless problem of corrosion on the HTF7000 thrust-reverser doors is a game changer. Finally, engineering and technology exists that can repair for now, and permanently resolve very soon, a horribly expensive and time-consuming problem that will not go away by installing new OEM doors.  … It’s such a win-win for the operator. Its’ kind of a no-brainer.”

QTA’s 2022 NBAA-BACE presentations will also include displays germane to the company’s popular STC’d permanent solution to the engine inner-barrel corrosion by which numerous legacy and contemporary business jets are affected. QTA has earned eight STC approvals for its engine inlet corrosion solution, all of which offer operators a lifetime structural and transferable warranty.

QTA Inner-Barrel STCs support Bombardier’s Challenger 300/350; Embraer’s Legacy 450/500 and Praetor 500/600; Dassault’s Falcon 2000LX/EX; Gulfstream’s G200, 280, and 450; Textron’s Hawker 1000; and LearJet’s 60/60XR.

FMI: www.qtaerospace.com

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