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Sat, Apr 15, 2023

NTSB Prelim: Cessna 182S

Airplane Impacted Mountainous Terrain About 30 Miles SW Of CPR At An Elevation Of About 6,990 Ft Mean Sea Level (MSL)

Location: Alcova, WY Accident Number: WPR23FA137
Date & Time: March 21, 2023, 16:01 Local Registration: N314FR
Aircraft: Cessna 182S Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Aerial observation

On March 21, 2023 about 1601 mountain daylight time, a Cessna, 182S, N314FR, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Alcova, Wyoming. The pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 aerial observation.

The operator reported that the pilot departed Evanston-Uinta County Airport - Burns Field (EVW) Evanston, Wyoming, on an aerial pipeline patrol. Flight tracking data for the airplane showed a pause in the flight  near mountains terrain about 30 miles south of Casper, Wyoming. The operator notified Flight Service of a possible mishap and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) subsequently issued an Alert Notice (ALNOT).

Recorded Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) data showed that the accident airplane overflew Casper, Wyoming at 15:40:48 and turned to a southwest heading for about 30 miles. The airplane continued on a southwest heading until ADS-B contact was lost at 16:00:44, about 950 ft northwest of the accident site. The airplane wreckage was located by a Search and Rescue air unit later that evening.

Examination of the accident site revealed that the airplane impacted mountainous terrain about 30 miles southwest of CPR at an elevation of about 6,990 ft mean sea level (msl). The wreckage was oriented on northwest heading.

There are no known witnesses to the accident sequence. The wreckage was recovered to a secure location for further examination.

FMI: www.ntsb.gov

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