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Mon, Jun 21, 2021

NTSB Prelim: Boeing A75N1 (PT17)

During The Initial Climb Out, The Airplane Stopped Gaining Altitude

Location: Hollister, CA Accident Number: WPR21LA208
Date & Time: May 26, 2021, 14:30 Local Registration: N75016
Aircraft: Boeing A75N1(PT17) Injuries: 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On May 26, 2021, about 1430 pacific daylight time, a Boeing A75N1, N75016, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Frazier Lake Airpark (1C9), Hollister, California.

The pilot and pilot-rated passenger sustained minor injuries. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

The pilot reported that, after he purchased the accident airplane, he sent the airplane to a local maintenance shop for an annual inspection. A couple of days later, the airplane was returned to service and the pilot received about a three-hour walkaround and preflight covering the details of the airplane. On the day of the accident, the pilot and a pilot-rated passenger completed a preflight inspection and engine run up with no anomalies noted. They performed 10 full stop takeoff and landings, then flew to Hollister, California to refuel the airplane. The pilot performed another takeoff and landing when they returned to 1C9. During the initial climb out, the airplane stopped gaining altitude. The passenger reported that he noticed that the airplane was not gaining nor losing altitude, so he verified that the propeller lever, the throttle lever, the mixture control lever, and the fuel selector lever, were all in their correct positions. The pilot added that although the “RPMs were just dropping,” the airplane never lost all power. Shortly after, the pilot initiated a right turn to maneuver away from telephone lines and completed a forced landing in a soft dirt field, where airplane came to rest upright.

The airplane and the engine were recovered and will be examined.

FMI: www.ntsb.gov

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