No-Fly List Now Holds Some 31,000 Names | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Most Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

Airborne-Monday

Airborne-Tuesday

Airborne-Wednesday Airborne-Thursday

Airborne-Friday

Airborne On YouTube

Airborne-Unlimited-05.20.24

Airborne-NextGen-05.21.24

Airborne-Unlimited-05.15.24 Airborne-AffordableFlyers-05.16.24

Airborne-Unlimited-05.17.24

Tue, Apr 19, 2005

No-Fly List Now Holds Some 31,000 Names

More Details On KLM Incident

As sources tell Time Magazine the US No-Fly list has ballooned from 19,000 names in September to more than 31,000 this month, we're learning more about why a KLM flight from Amsterdam to Mexico City was forbidden to fly in US airspace earlier this month. At the bottom line, the TSA is now trying to expand its ability to keep people off commercial flights -- not just in the US, but all over the world.

As ANN reported, the KLM flight was flying near the US-Canadian border when it was denied permission to continue flying through US airspace on April 8th. The reason? Time reports two of the passengers on board were Saudi citizens. The TSA said the two men had trained as pilots with 9/11 hijacker Hani Hanjour. The flight was turned back and eventually landed in London. They were eventually allowed to fly from London back to Saudi Arabia.

Dutch authorities questioned the men and raised a stink over the fact that neither was on any Dutch watch list. So, they wondered, just how did the US find out they were on the flight and figure they might pose a threat?

But the TSA's proposal to expand the watch list to international airlines that don't make landfall in the US could start another trans-Atlantic fight over aviation security.  "This could open up the U.S. to retaliation," one source told Time. That same source warned that restricting overflight privileges "would be much more of a burden for US airlines, which fly over many more countries than foreign airlines passing through US airspace."

FMI: www.tsa.gov

Advertisement

More News

ANN's Daily Aero-Term (05.19.24): Back-Taxi

Back-Taxi A term used by air traffic controllers to taxi an aircraft on the runway opposite to the traffic flow. The aircraft may be instructed to back-taxi to the beginning of the>[...]

Aero-News: Quote of the Day (05.19.24)

“Our WAI members across the nation are grateful for the service and sacrifice of the formidable group of WASP who served so honorably during World War II. This group of brave>[...]

Aero-News: Quote of the Day (05.20.24)

“Many aspiring pilots fall short of their goal due to the cost of flight training, so EAA working with the Ray Foundation helps relieve some of the financial pressure and mak>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Term (05.20.24): Blind Speed

Blind Speed The rate of departure or closing of a target relative to the radar antenna at which cancellation of the primary radar target by moving target indicator (MTI) circuits i>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Linx (05.20.24)

Aero Linx: International Airline Medical Association (IAMA) The International Airline Medical Association, formerly known as the Airline Medical Directors Association (AMDA) was fo>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2024 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC