GPS Marks 40 Years Of Aiding Navigation | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Most Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

Airborne-Monday

Airborne-Tuesday

Airborne-Wednesday Airborne-Thursday

Airborne-Friday

Airborne On YouTube

Airborne-Unlimited-07.15.24

Airborne-NextGen-07.16.24

Airborne-Unlimited-07.17.24

Airborne-FlightTraining-07.18.24

Airborne-Unlimited-07.19.24

Sat, Jul 22, 2017

GPS Marks 40 Years Of Aiding Navigation

Rockwell Collins Celebrates Four Decades Since Receiving The World's First GPS Satellite Signal

Working well after midnight on a mid-July day in 1977, a Rockwell Collins engineer named David Van Dusseldorp sat on the rooftop of a company building in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, adjusting an antenna every five minutes to receive a signal from the world’s first Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite known as NTS-2. Within a small window of time, the satellite was turned on and the message was successfully received and decoded by the team working the GPS receiver below.

Since then the technology has grown to be the standard of navigation around the world and touches nearly every part of our daily lives. To commemorate the 40 year anniversary, Rockwell Collins invited retirees involved in the project to share their firsthand stories at an event held in Cedar Rapids today.

“We had leaders and team members working together and I knew we could meet the challenge put before us,” said Van Dusseldorp. “The future of GPS was uncertain at the time, but I really felt like we had just accomplished something important.”

Soon after successfully receiving the signal, the U.S. Air Force awarded Rockwell Collins the Navstar GPS user equipment contract. This was the first of many wins that would position the company as a market leader in GPS products for aerospace and defense. Since that time, Rockwell Collins has continued to pioneer advancements in GPS such as being the first to complete a transatlantic flight using GPS navigation in 1983. In 1994, a secure, military-grade Precision Lightweight GPS Receiver (PLGR) was first fielded that provided warfighters a tactical navigational advantage on the battlefield. And in 2014, Rockwell Collins achieved another milestone in navigation technology by successfully developing a prototype to track a satellite in the Galileo Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) being created by the European Union to provide global coverage for its nations.

A modern version of the GPS receiver used in 1977 is the Rockwell Collins GPS-4000S, which has the ability to process the transmissions of up to 10 GPS satellites and two Space Based Augmentation Systems (SBAS) geostationary satellites simultaneously. Compared to the first GPS receiver station that was six feet tall, the GPS-4000S receiver is only 7.87 inches tall. Size and power of receivers have evolved for different applications, like the Micro GPS Receiver Application Module (MicroGRAM). The receiver is only one inch tall, can use data from up to 12 GPS satellites and consumes the least power of any receiver in its class. Other advancements in receivers include industry-leading anti-jamming and anti-spoofing technologies that are crucial to security and efficiency when used within critical military and aircraft operations.

(Image provided with Rockwell Collins news release)

FMI: www.rockwellcollins.com

Advertisement

More News

Kickstarting Your Aviation Journey at Oshkosh 2024

A Guide to Making the Most out of the World’s Biggest Airshow EAA’s Oshkosh Airventure generates fun for all aviation lovers. You get a chance to see, touch, and maybe >[...]

Aero-News: Quote of the Day (07.22.24)

"We're excited to offer our advanced avionics to a broader range of aircraft while maintaining our commitment to value. Twin-engine aircraft usually pay a significant premium to eq>[...]

Electric Power Systems Seeks TSO for Rechargeable Battery System

Modular, Scalable Lithium Battery System for Select Aircraft Electric Power Systems, Inc., announced that it has submitted its application to the FAA for a Technical Standard Order>[...]

Advanced Micro Turbines Find Footing in USA

350 Pound-feet of Thrust Now Available in a Small, Lightweight Package UAV Propulsion Tech signed an agreement with AMT-Advanced Micro Turbines to begin marketing their tiny little>[...]

Klyde Morris (07.22.23)

Klyde Provokes The Ultimate Oshkosh Invite... Sorta... FMI: www.klydemorris.com>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2024 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC