Scientists Say Moon Colony Is Possible, And Maybe Affordable | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Most Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

Airborne-Monday

Airborne-Tuesday

Airborne-Wednesday Airborne-Thursday

Airborne-Friday

Airborne On YouTube

Airborne-Unlimited-12.04.23

Airborne-NextGen-11.28.23

Airborne-Unlimited-11.29.23 Airborne-Affordable Flyers-11.30.23

Airborne-Unlimited-12.01.23

Thu, Mar 24, 2016

Scientists Say Moon Colony Is Possible, And Maybe Affordable

Permanent Human Presence Could Be Established In Six Years For $10 Billion, According To Published Studies

NASA could establish a permanent colony on the Moon by 2020 for a cost of about $10 billion, according to a series of studies published in the journal New Space.

The website sciencealert.com reports that according to the articles which were the result of a workshop held in the summer of 2014, new technology could make it possible to establish a Moon colony in five to seven years for less than the cost of one new aircraft carrier.

The papers envision a colony of 10 people who would be on the moon for up to a year at first, but within about 10 years it could grow to a self-sufficient settlement of about 100 people. The first components of the colony would start their journey aboard SpaceX Falcon Heavy rockets, but eventually the colonists would use additive manufacturing to create many of the things they'd need on the lunar surface. The colony would likely be established on the rim of a crater near one of the Moon's poles so that it would get sufficient sunlight to keep electricity generated by solar panels flowing. Colonists would likely live in structures similar to the Bigelow inflatable habitats currently under evaluation.

The colony would be resupplied using SpaceX reusable Falcon 9 boosters, which would significantly cut the cost of sustaining the effort.

Chris McKay, the NASA astrobiologist who edited the special open-access issue of New Space, told Popular Science that he is not really interested in the Moon, but that a research base on Mars will not be possible "unless we can learn to do it on the Moon first. The Moon provides a blueprint to Mars."

(Images from file)

FMI: New Space, Science Alert

Advertisement

More News

Klyde Morris (12.04.22)

Klyde Can't Wait For The Chance To Make More Trouble FMI: www.klydemorris.com>[...]

Classic Aero-TV: Falling for Para-PhernaliaÂ’s Softie Emergency Parachutes

From 2023 (YouTube Version):The Best Option for Pilots’ Worst Days Since its 1979 founding, Para-Phernalia, Inc. has designed and manufactured the Softie line of pilot emerge>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Term (12.01.23): Landing Area

Landing Area Any locality either on land, water, or structures, including airports/heliports and intermediate landing fields, which is used, or intended to be used, for the landing>[...]

Aero-News: Quote of the Day (12.01.23)

“This successful demonstration of a fully autonomous flight from takeoff to landing is a great step towards the reduced pilot workload and simplified HMI that the Airbus Urba>[...]

Airborne 12.01.23: Sopwith Sim, Senate v FAA, SpaceX Buys Pioneer

Also: New Unleaded Avgas, Gogo Over-The-Air Update, Electrified Caravans, Gone West: Selena Shilad The Museum of Flight in Seattle, Washington recently obtained a pair of Sopwith C>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2023 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC