Airworthiness Directive Comes for Diamond DA42s | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Most Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

Airborne-Monday

Airborne-Tuesday

Airborne-Wednesday Airborne-Thursday

Airborne-Friday

Airborne On YouTube

Airborne-Unlimited-07.15.24

Airborne-NextGen-07.09.24

Airborne-Unlimited-07.10.24

Airborne-FlightTraining-07.11.24

Airborne-Unlimited-07.12.24

Tue, Apr 30, 2024

Airworthiness Directive Comes for Diamond DA42s

Inspection to Rudder Control Linkage Required Within 200 Hours for Diamond Twin Operators

Diamond has issued a revised Airworthiness Directive for the DA42, DA42 NG, and DA42 M-NG aircraft that replaces a rudder axle, superseding a previous publication regarding the same part.

The shift comes after the European Union Aviation Safety Agency took the original FAA AD into consideration, and updated their own guidance to "to correct an unsafe condition" on a handful of Diamond planes. The Directive orders the inspection of a self-locking nut used in the rudder T-yoke's bolt, and its installation should the nut be missing to begin with. Should the assembly not be correctly installed, operators run the risk of developing increasing play in the vertical movement of the bolt, diminishing effective rudder control in flight.

The Airworthiness Directive goes into effect on the 28th of May 2024, giving operators some time to match the inspection up to their 100-hr inspection. The FAA notes that the Final Directive received a scant few comments for the proposed rule, with the majority of commenters in favor of the rule without any revisions.

One commenter, DAI, proposed that the compliance time in the Directive be adjusted from "within 200 hours time-in-service or 9 months after the effective date of this AD". They said that extending the compliance time by 3 months would "not affect safety and allow the inspection of the rudder steering bracket and the installation of the T-yoke bolt to be performed during the annual inspection." The FAA ultimately decided to use "time in service" as opposed to "flight hours" since the former is defined in FAA regulations with respect to maintenance records.

FMI: www.faa.gov

Advertisement

More News

Classic Aero-TV: The Ultimate 'Solo' Trip -- Cameron Balloons' Sky Hopper

From 2011 (YouTube Version): A Unique, Affordable and Isolated way to Enjoy Ballooning Ballooning is both a unique as well as eclectic pursuit... and it attracts (naturally) a pret>[...]

Aero-News: Quote of the Day (07.14.24)

"Aviation in Alaska is essential to the transportation infrastructure. Many of our Alaskan customers rely on our products to access their homes, their communities, and run their bu>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Term (07.14.24): Approach Speed

Approach Speed The recommended speed contained in aircraft manuals used by pilots when making an approach to landing. This speed will vary for different segments of an approach as >[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Linx (07.14.24)

Aero Linx: Japan Business Aviation Association (JBAA) The Japan Business Aircraft Association (JBAA) was established in May 1996 as an incorporated nonprofit organization (in April>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Term (07.15.24): Apron

Apron A defined area on an airport or heliport intended to accommodate aircraft for purposes of loading or unloading passengers or cargo, refueling, parking, or maintenance. With r>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2024 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC