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Georgia Man Sentenced To Prison For Pointing Lasers At Aircraft

Man Pleads Guilty To Three Separate Incidents, FAA and FBI Investigation

A Rincon, GA man has been sentenced to 18 months in prison after Aiming A Laser Pointer at an Aircraft and pleading guilty. After the sentence is served, Roger Floyd Hendricks, 48, will serve three years of supervised release. 

In February 2020, the FBI and FAA began investigating three incidents that took place separately. The incidents were described as green laser strikes on airplanes that were heading into Savannah-Hilton Head International Airport. One of the pilots involved was able to help them find the origin of the strike.

When questioned and identified, Hendricks pleaded guilty on May 3, 2021. 

“Hendricks needlessly threatened the safety of the passengers and crew of a commercial aircraft. It is important for the public to understand that pointing any laser, even a small one, at an aircraft can obscure the pilot’s view and jeopardize the safe operations of the aircraft,” said Chris Hacker, Special Agent in Charge of FBI Atlanta in a statement.

“Hopefully this sentencing will send a message that the FBI will not tolerate those engaging in this dangerous behavior and that they will be aggressively investigated and prosecuted to the full extent of the law.”

The FBI offered a reward of $2,500 when they began their investigation into the incidents over a year ago. 

“When you’re flying an aircraft where you have to maintain altitude and heading and things like that, and now you’re blind and can’t even see the instruments inside your own aircraft, you definitely find yourself at a significant risk," said Savannah Aviation Flight Instructor, Joe Rodriguez.

FMI: www.savannahairport.com

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