Milestone Reached In Development Of Next Rocket Engine For Human Spaceflight | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

** Airborne 10.01.14 ** HD iPad-Friendly -- Airborne 10.01.14 **
** Airborne 09.29.14 ** HD iPad-Friendly -- Airborne 09.29.14 **
** Airborne 09.26.14 ** HD iPad-Friendly -- Airborne 09.26.14 **

Fri, Apr 26, 2013

Milestone Reached In Development Of Next Rocket Engine For Human Spaceflight

Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne Completes J-2X Hot Fire Testing

The last in a series of hot-fire tests on a J-2X engine with a stub-nozzle extension at simulated altitude conditions has been completed by Pratt &Whitney Rocketdyne. This latest chapter in the development of America's next rocket engine paves the way toward full-motion testing of the J-2X engine, which is designed to power humans to Mars.  NASA has selected the J-2X as the upper-stage propulsion for the evolved 143-ton Space Launch System (SLS), an advanced heavy-lift launch vehicle.

"This test series with the stub-nozzle extension was very successful," said Walt Janowski, J-2X program manager, Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne.  "We completed all the objectives we set out to accomplish, and acquired important information to help us better understand how the engine will perform during flight – from thrust, hardware durability and combustion stability.  We look forward to continuing to work with NASA to provide a safe, reliable transportation system to explore new destinations in space."

In the latest series of tests with the stub-nozzle extension, J-2X Engine 10002 was tested six times for a total of 2,156 seconds on the A-2 test stand at John C. Stennis Space Center in Mississippi. The stub-nozzle extension allows engineers to test the engine in near-vacuum conditions, similar to what it will experience in the extreme environment of space. The next step is to move the engine to the A-1 test stand, where it will be fired to test the range of gimbal motion for its flexible parts.  Engine 10002 is the second J-2X development engine built by Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne for NASA.

The first J-2X engine, Engine 10001, was tested a total of 21 times for more than 45 minutes last year. The J-2X powerpack, which consists of components on top of the engine, was tested separately 13 times for a total of more than 100 minutes at Stennis Space Center.  The engines and powerpack were fired at varying pressures, temperatures and flow rates to ensure the engine is ready to support exploration beyond low-Earth orbit, Mars and beyond.

(Images provided by NASA)

FMI: www.PrattWhitneyRocketdyne.com


Advertisement

More News

AeroSports Update: 38th World Military Parachuting Championship

Countries From Around The World Participated In The 38th World Military Parachuting Championship Competition In Indonesia The competition is part of a program administered through >[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Linx (10.01.14)

NBAA/CAN Soiree One of the much-anticipated events of the NBAA conference, being held this year in Orlando.>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Term (10.01.14): Fixed Slot

A fixed, nozzle shaped opening near the leading edge of a wing that ducts air onto the top surface of the wing.>[...]

Aero-News: Quote Of The Day (10.01.14)

“SNC is offering access to crewed or uncrewed space missions." Source: John Roth, vice president of business development for SNC’s Space Systems.>[...]

ANN FAQ: Feel The Propwash!

Get Aero-News Delivered To Your E-Mail We know you, like many of our readers, make it a point to check out the latest news and information daily on Aero-News... but did you know th>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2014 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC