Boeing Wins Contract To Design DARPA Airborne Satellite Launch System | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

Airborne Unlimited-
Monday

Airborne-Unmanned w/AUVSI-
Tuesday

Airborne Unlimited-
Wednesday

AMA Drone Report-
Thursday

Airborne Unlimited-
Friday

Airborne On ANN

Airborne 04.23.18

Airborne-UnManned 04.24.18

Airborne 04.18.18

AMA Drone Report 04.19.18

Airborne 04.20.18

Airborne-YouTube

Airborne 04.23.18

Airborne-UnManned 04.24.18

Airborne 04.18.18

AMA Drone Report 04.19.18

Airborne 04.20.18

Fri, Apr 04, 2014

Boeing Wins Contract To Design DARPA Airborne Satellite Launch System

Would Allow Small Satellites To Be Launched From An F-15E

What Boeing vehicle would hitch a ride on an F-15E, drop from the aircraft, fire its engines and deploy microsatellites into space? It’s a new satellite launch vehicle concept designed by Phantom Works Advanced Space Exploration for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) called the Airborne Launch Assist Space Access or ALASA.

Under an 11-month, $30.6-million contract with options to build up to 12 of the 24-foot vehicles, Boeing and DARPA intend to test the ability to cut the cost of routinely launching microsatellites into orbit by 66 percent. According to DARPA, ALASA aims to develop and employ radical advances in launch systems, leading to more affordable and responsive space access compared to current military and U.S. commercial launch operations.

Rockets today are designed using a number of stages, each with its own engine and fuel tanks. The first stage is at the bottom and is usually the largest, the second and subsequent upper stages are above it, and normally decrease in size. “With our design, the first and second stages are powered by the same engines, reducing weight and complexity.”

As these stages are jettisoned (or dropped), the fuel tank and engines are just thrown away. We developed a cost-effective design by moving the engines forward on the launch vehicle. With our design, the first and second stages are powered by the same engines, reducing weight and complexity,” explained Steve Johnston, director, Advanced Space Exploration.

The 24-foot ALASA vehicle is designed to attach under an F-15E aircraft. Once the airplane reaches approximately 40,000 feet, it would release the ALASA vehicle. The vehicle would then fire its four main engines and launch into low-Earth orbit to deploy one or more microsatellites weighing up to a total of 100 pounds.

(Image provided by Boeing)

FMI: www.boeing.com

Advertisement

More News

UPDATE: The Dirtiest of Washington Politics? -- ATC Privatization By Deception?

Stunning, Deceptive, Dirty Politics... Shuster Is At It Again, But This Time We Need To React FAST! ANN RealTime News Update, 04.24.18, 2302 ET: Well... initial info suggests that >[...]

AMA Drone Report 04.19.18: AMA Leadership, FAA Reauthorization, Coachella

Also: New French Regs, Drone Boot Camp, Public Safety Drone Standards, DroneShield Protects NASCAR It’s a little bit sad and yet a bit cool to see AMA make an exciting change>[...]

Airborne/Barnstorming 04.23.18: We Can Do So Much Better...

I'll Admit It... We're A Mite Frustrated, But We're ALSO Not Quitting... Ever Comments/Analysis/News/Video by ANN CEO/Editor-In-Chief, Jim Campbell We've accomplished so much over >[...]

Airborne 04.23.18: Hemisphere Suspended, Thunderbirds Fly, Apple v Drones

Also: New NASA Administrator, AD For CFM56-7B, Engine Display Upgrade On C-441, First BBJ MAX Textron Aviation has suspended work on the Citation Hemisphere large business jet, cit>[...]

ANNouncement: Now Accepting Applications For Oshkosh 2018 Stringers!!!

An Amazing Experience Awaits The Chosen Few... E-I-C Note: There's very little we can say yet, but there is a reason why this may be THE year to throw in with ANN to cover the extr>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2018 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC