Amazing Mars Rover Pix: Opportunity Locates Heat Shield | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

Airborne Unlimited-
Monday

Airborne Unmanned-
Alt. Wednesdays

Airborne Flight Training-Alt. Wednesdays

Airborne Unlimited-
Friday

Airborne Special Programs!
Airborne-YouTube  Airborne Unlimited--09.28.20 Airborne-Unmanned--09.16.20   Airborne-Flight Training--09.23.20 Airborne Unlimited--09.25.20  The 2020 Avionics Innovation Preview!

Airborne On ANN

Airborne Unlimited--09.28.20

Airborne-Unmanned--09.16.20

Airborne-Flight Training--09.23.20

Airborne Unlimited--09.25.20

Airborne's Annual April 1st Episode

Thu, Mar 03, 2005

Amazing Mars Rover Pix: Opportunity Locates Heat Shield

Remains of Shield Found... In Pieces

The accompanying images from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity show the remains of the rover's heat shield, broken into two key pieces, the main piece on the left side and a broken-off flank piece near the middle of the image.

The heat shield impact site is identified by the circle of red dust on the right side of the picture. In this view, Opportunity is approximately 20 meters (66 feet) away from the heat shield, which protected it while hurtling through the martian atmosphere.

In the far left of the image, a meteorite called "Heat Shield Rock," sits nearby, The Sun is reflecting off the silver-colored underside of the internal thermal blankets of the heat shield. The rover spent 36 sols investigating how the severe heating during entry through the atmosphere affected the heat shield. The most obvious is the fact that the heat shield inverted upon impact.

This is an approximately true-color rendering of the scene acquired around 1:22 p.m. local solar time on Opportunity sol 324 (Dec. 21, 2004) in an image mosaic using panoramic filters at wavelengths of 750, 530, and 430 nanometers.

The rover spent 36 sols investigating how the severe heating during entry through the atmosphere affected the heat shield. The most obvious is the fact that the heat shield inverted upon impact. This is the panoramic camera team's best current attempt at generating a true-color view of what this scene would look like if viewed by a human on Mars.

It was generated from a mathematical combination of six calibrated, left-eye panoramic camera images acquired around 1:50 p.m. local solar time on Opportunity's sol 322 (Dec. 19, 2004) using filters ranging in wavelengths from 430 to 750 nanometers.

FMI: http://www.nasa.gov/vision/universe/solarsystem/mer_main.html

Advertisement

More News

Airborne 09.28.20: Panthera Flt Test, Arsenal of Democracy, ZeroAvia Pax Flt

Also: NASA Polishes Image, Drone Airspace Access, All-Electric Ecomax Heli, 1st Brazilian Gripen One of the efforts ANN and Jim Campbell are best known for, are our flight test rep>[...]

Airborne-Flight Training 09.23.20: DA20 Upgrades, CAE Financing, EMU Partnership

Also: Sterling Flight Training, National Aviation Academy, Young Eagles Workshops, ERAU Suspensions One of our favorite training birds is back... and upgraded, to boot! The high de>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Linx (09.27.20)

Aero Linx: Aviation Working Group (AWG) Aviation Working Group (AWG) is a not-for-profit legal entity comprised of major aviation manufacturers, leasing companies and financial ins>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Term (09.27.20): Flameout Pattern

Flameout Pattern An approach normally conducted by a single-engine military aircraft experiencing loss or anticipating loss of engine power or control. The standard overhead approa>[...]

Aero-News: Quote of the Day (09.27.20)

“Our hearts go out to all of those affected by the fires. We are confident in the skills of these selfless, dedicated CAP volunteers who contribute so much to both the local >[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2020 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC