FAA Changes Night Landing Rules At KSFO | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Most Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

Airborne-Monday

Airborne-Tuesday

Airborne-Wednesday Airborne-Thursday

Airborne-Friday

Airborne On YouTube

Airborne Unlimited-09.27.21

Airborne-UnManned-09.21.21

Airborne-Unlimited-09.15.21

Airborne-Flight Training-09.23.21

Airborne Unlimited-09.24.21

ANN LIVE Coverage of AEA 2021 Is Archived at www.airborne-live.net

Sat, Aug 19, 2017

FAA Changes Night Landing Rules At KSFO

Move Follows Incident In Which An Air Canada Crew Lined Up To Land On An Active Taxiway

The FAA has issued new rules for night landings and tower staffing at San Francisco International Airport (KSFO) following an incident in which an Air Canada A320 nearly landed on a taxiway where four other airliners were lined up waiting to depart from the airport.

The Seattle Times reports that the new procedures will go into effect when a runway parallel to the incoming flight's designated runway is closed. That was the scenario on July 7 when the Air Canada incident occurred, and officials believe that it might have contributed to the confusion on the part of the crew.

Pilots will no longer be allowed to make visual approaches at night when an adjacent runway is shut down, according to the new rules. Pilots will be required to make an instrument approach to assure they line up on the correct runway.

Control tower staffing will also be beefed up during late-night periods when traffic is heavy. FAA spokesman Ian Gregor said on Thursday that two controllers will be required in the tower during those times. Only one was reportedly working when the Air Canada incident took place.

According to information released by the NTSB, the Air Canada A320 flew down the taxiway nearly a quarter or a mile at altitudes as low as 59 feet before executing a go-around. The circled and landed safely on the second approach.

The pilots told investigators with the NTSB that the do not recall seeing the four airplanes sitting on the taxiway where they intended to land, but "something did not look right to them," according to the report.

FMI: www.faa.gov

Advertisement

More News

ANN FAQ (Updated): You Can Sponsor ANN And/Or Aero-TV!

Help ANN Grow So That We Can Be Of Greater Service To You! For nearly 25 years, ANN has set the pace for the growing and evolving aero-info revolution. No other news service has do>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Term (09.24.21): Wind Shear Escape

Wind Shear Escape An unplanned abortive maneuver initiated by the pilot in command (PIC) as a result of onboard cockpit systems. Wind shear escapes are characterized by maximum thr>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Term (09.25.21): Simultaneous Offset Instrument Approach (SOIA)

Simultaneous Offset Instrument Approach (SOIA) An instrument landing system comprised of an ILS PRM, RNAV PRM or GLS PRM approach to one runway and an offset LDA PRM with glideslop>[...]

Aero-News: Quote of the Day (09.25.21)

"This is an important first step toward a solution to the FAA's misguided interpretation on flight training. The FAA did not heed the [Transportation and Infrastructure] Committee'>[...]

Airborne-Flight Training 09.23.21: RedTail Flt Academy, Whirly-Girls, Pan Am

Also: Legacy Flight Training, New CAP-10C NG, EAA Ultralight/LSA Council, T-45 Loss The RedTail Flight Academy celebrated the opening of its flight academy September 10th at New Yo>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2021 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC