NASA To Drop Helicopter In Safety Study | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

Airborne Unlimited-
Monday

Airborne-Unmanned w/AUVSI-
Tuesday

Airborne Unlimited-
Wednesday

AMA Drone Report-
Thursday

Airborne Unlimited-
Friday

Airborne On ANN

Airborne Unlimited--12.09.19

Airborne UnManned--12.10.19

Airborne Unlimited--12.11.19

AMA Drone Report--12.12.19

Airborne Unlimited--12.13.19

Airborne-YouTube

Airborne Unlimited--12.09.19

Airborne UnManned--12.10.19

Airborne Unlimited--12.11.19

AMA Drone Report--12.12.19

Airborne Unlimited--12.13.19

Fri, Aug 23, 2013

NASA To Drop Helicopter In Safety Study

Tests Conducted In Collaboration With The FAA, Army, Navy

NASA researchers will drop a 45-foot-long helicopter fuselage from a height of about 30 feet to test improved seat belts and seats and advance experimental techniques and crashworthiness data. NASA is collaborating with the U.S. Navy, U.S. Army and Federal Aviation Administration on the Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Test Bed full-scale crash tests at Langley's Landing and Impact Research Facility.

"We have instrumented a former Marine helicopter airframe with cameras and accelerometers," said lead test engineer Martin Annett. "Almost 40 cameras inside and outside the helicopter will record how 13 crash test dummies react before, during and after impact."
 
During the test, onboard computers will record more than 350 channels of data as the helicopter is swung by cables, like a pendulum, into a bed of soil. Just before impact, pyrotechnic devices release the suspension cables from the helicopter to allow free flight. The helicopter will hit the ground at about 30 mph. The impact condition represents a severe but survivable condition under both civilian and military requirements. For the first time ever in any test, technicians installed a video game motion sensor in the helicopter. "We want to see if it is useful as an additional way to track the movements of the dummies," said test engineer Justin Littell.
 
The outside of the fuselage also is new for this test. Technicians painted one entire side in black polka dots over a white background -- a photographic technique called full field photogrammetry. Each dot represents a data point. High-speed cameras filming at 500 images per second track each dot, so after over the drop researchers can plot and see exactly how the fuselage buckled, bent, cracked or collapsed under crash loads.
 
Another crash test of a similar helicopter equipped with additional technology, including composite airframe retrofits, is planned for next year. Both tests are part of the Rotary Wing Project in the Fundamental Aeronautics Program of NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate.
 
The Navy provided the CH-46 Sea Knight helicopter fuselages, seats, crash test dummies and other experiments for the test. The Army contributed a litter experiment with a crash test dummy. The Federal Aviation Administration provided a side-facing specialized crash test dummy and part of the data acquisition system. Cobham Life Support-St. Petersburg, a division of CONAX Florida Corporation, also contributed an active restraint system for the cockpit.
 
NASA will use the results of both tests in efforts to improve rotorcraft performance and efficiency, in part by assessing the reliability of high performance, lightweight composite materials. Researchers also want to increase industry knowledge and create more complete computer models that can be used to design better helicopters. The ultimate goal of NASA rotary wing research is to help make helicopters and other vertical take-off and landing vehicles more serviceable -- able to carry more passengers and cargo -- quicker, quieter, safer and greener. Improved designs might allow helicopters to be used more extensively in the airspace system.

FMI: www.nasa.gov
 

Advertisement

More News

Garmin Announces Approval Of Diversity Transponders

GTX 335D And GTX 345D Approved By FAA, EASA And TCCA Garmin has received FAA STC approval, in conjunction with European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) and Transport Canada Civil Avi>[...]

Airborne 12.11.19: Granley's Airshow Record, Global Spitfire, AirVenture

Also: Tuskegee Airman's 100th, Blue Angels Update, Piper Aircraft, SpaceX In-Flight Abort Test Walking the floor of the International Council Of Airshows convention is fun stuff...>[...]

AMA Drone Report 12.12.19: A.I. Robotic Racing, Drones v Dogs, Dronestrike Claim

Also: Recreational Drone Flying Aeronautical Test, Drone Poll, OSU Drone Project, AF Academy UAS Center Lockheed Martin and The Drone Racing League have announced the winning Alpha>[...]

Airborne-Unmanned 12.10.19: EHang In-City Demo, ISO Standards, DroneStrike?

Also: Drone Aviation-ComSovereign, Public Safety UAS Training, Disaster Management, NCDOT Drone Program EHang has announced its strategic partnership with property developer Heli C>[...]

Airborne 12.13.19: Snowbirds AirVenture-Bound, DeLand Showcase 2020, ePlane Flt

Also: First Modified Osprey, Sunken F4F Wildcat Found, Rebuilding Monmouth IL Airport, Boeing Fine The Canadian Forces Snowbirds will make AirVenture a part of its 50th year perfor>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2019 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC