Paper: Gainesville Accident Plane Was Out Of Annual | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

Airborne Unlimited-
Monday

Airborne-Unmanned w/AUVSI-
Tuesday

Airborne Unlimited-
Wednesday

AMA Drone Report-
Thursday

Airborne Unlimited-
Friday

Airborne On ANN

Airborne Unlimited--03.23.20

Airborne UnManned--
03.24.20

Airborne Unlimited--03.25.20

Airborne Unlimited--03.26.20

Airborne Unlimited--03.27.20

Airborne-YouTube

Airborne Unlimited--03.23.20

Airborne UnManned--
03.24.20

Airborne Unlimited--03.25.20

Airborne Unlimited--03.26.20

Airborne Unlimited--03.27.20

Wed, Apr 19, 2006

Paper: Gainesville Accident Plane Was Out Of Annual

Victim Developed Autopilot Later Sold By Chelton

The National Transportation Safety Board investigator now combing through the wreckage of last Sunday's fatal accident involving a Beechcraft B-60 Duke (file photo of type, below) at Gainesville Regional Airport says the airplane had an out-of-date annual inspection.

"Every year at a minimum, it has to have an inspection," said the NTSB's John Lovell to the Gainesville (FL) Sun. Lovell declined to say when Prof. Giuseppe Basile's aircraft was last examined, although he noted there were "no entries" on the plane's maintenance log to indicate it had been inspected in the past year.

Basile, 69, was a noted engineering professor. He was flying with one of his former students, Steve Varosi, 40, and Varosi's 12-year-old nephew Michael when witnesses report the Duke rolled to the right shortly after takeoff from GNV Sunday afternoon. The Duke clipped an SUV parked outside the terminal as it impacted the ground, sending the vehicle into the passenger terminal of the airport.

All three onboard the aircraft perished in the accident, although no one on the ground was injured.

Relatives say Basile and Steve Varosi were conducting a test flight for a new autopilot system the two had developed when the accident occured. It is unknown whether that system may have played a role in the accident.

While teaching Electronics and Control Automation at the University of Bologna in 1973, Basile designed the AP-1 autopilot. An updated AP-2 version of this system was certified in Italy, manufactured, and marketed in 1977 by the Italian company O.C.E.M.

In 2001, Chelton Flight Systems purchased the FAA-certified AP-2C and AP-3C variants of the original autopilot system, and after several further modifications began to market the AP-3C one year later.

FMI: www.ntsb.gov

Advertisement

More News

Airborne 03.27.20: FAA Grounds Collings, OSH20 Update, Mars Rover Selfie

Also: COVID-19 Relief, SpaceX Rocket Motor Failure, Denver Metroplex Project, Etihad Cargo 787s The FAA has issued an order immediately rescinding the authority it had granted to T>[...]

Airborne 03.27.20: FAA Grounds Collings, OSH20 Update, Mars Rover Selfie

Also: COVID-19 Relief, SpaceX Rocket Motor Failure, Denver Metroplex Project, Etihad Cargo 787s The FAA has issued an order immediately rescinding the authority it had granted to T>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Term (03.29.20): Class B

Class B Generally, that airspace from the surface to 10,000 feet MSL surrounding the nation’s busiest airports in terms of airport operations or passenger enplanements. The c>[...]

Aero-News: Quote of the Day (03.29.20)

“We have confronted economic sustainability challenges in the past in terms of various financial crises, the 9/11 attacks, the Eyjafjallajökull volcano eruption, and ind>[...]

AMA Drone Report 03.26.20: Remote ID RFI, UAV Dodgeball, UAS Reg Extended

Also: Mars Rover Takes Selfie, AMA Working Remotely, Drones Save Koalas, ANN's Infamous April 1st Edition The FAA has posted a Request for Information (RFI) seeking input from the >[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2020 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC