Pilot In August Accident Was Attempting To Return To The Airport | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Most Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

Airborne-Monday

Airborne-Tuesday

Airborne-Wednesday Airborne-Thursday

Airborne-Friday

Airborne On YouTube

Airborne-Unlimited-05.23.22

Airborne-UnCrewed-05.17.22

Airborne-Unlimited-05.18.22

Airborne-Flt Training-05.19.22

Airborne Unlimited-05.20.22

Thu, Sep 04, 2014

Pilot In August Accident Was Attempting To Return To The Airport

Four Fatally Injured When Cessna 172 Went Down

The NTSB has released its preliminary report from an accident which occurred August 25th in Willoughby Hills, OH involving a rented Cessna 172R airplane with four people on board. All four were fatally injured in the accident.

According to the report, airplane went down shortly after takeoff from the Cuyahoga County Airport (KCGF). The airplane was substantially damaged by impact and a post impact fire.

The airplane was registered to a private individual and operated by T & G Flying Club, Inc. The pilot rented the airplane and was flying it on a personal flight under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight which was not operating on a flight plan. The flight was originating at the time of the accident.

The pilot reserved the airplane from T&G Flying Club, at 2022 using an online reservation system. He reserved the airplane for 4 hours, beginning at 2030. The employees of the flying club had left for the evening by time the pilot and passengers arrived.

Two witnesses, stated that shortly after 2100, they saw 4 males walk across the ramp toward the tie-down area near hangar 7. One of the males had a carry-on type suitcase. The pilot and passengers then boarded a Cessna 172. One of the witnesses stated the airplane stayed on the ramp for about 30 minutes with the engine running. They did not see the airplane after this time.

At 2146, the pilot called ground control for a takeoff taxi clearance stating he was on the ramp south of the T&G Flight Club. The controller issued the pilot a clearance to taxi to runway 6 via the Alpha 7 taxiway to the Alpha taxiway. The controller also issued the wind condition as 140 degrees at 8 knots along with the altimeter setting. The pilot stated his radio was a little "fuzzy" and he asked the controller to repeat the clearance. The controller repeated the taxi clearance, which the pilot subsequently repeated. About 4 minutes later, the controller informed the pilot that he is taxiing to the wrong runway. After asking the controller to repeat what he said, the pilot stated "Thank you I'm sorry." The controller then issued taxi instructions back to the approach end of runway 6.

At 2156, the pilot radioed that he was ready to takeoff on runway 6. The controller asked the pilot what his direction of flight was going to be. The pilot responded that they were going to fly east to sightsee and that they would be back in a little while. The controller issued the takeoff clearance with a right turn after takeoff. At 2158, the pilot radioed that they were not climbing fast and they wanted to immediately make a left turn to turn around. The controller approved the left turn. The controller stated it appeared the airplane began a left turn when it descended to the ground. The controller reported that during the takeoff, the airplane became airborne about 100 feet past taxiway Alpha 6, which was approximately 2,000 feet down the runway.

The airplane impacted the ground, a chain link fence, a guy wire, and a telephone pole prior to coming to rest about 1,000 feet on a bearing of 20 degrees from the departure end of runway 6. This location is just north of the intersection of Bishop Road and Curtiss Wright Parkway.

The wreckage path was along a 210 degree heading. The left wing tip, including the position light, was embedded in the ground at the first impact mark. This mark was east of the chain link fence. The airplane then traveled through the fence, with the left wing contacting one of the fence posts. The main impact crater was in the west side of the fence. Adjacent to the crater were two slash marks in the soft ground. Both marks were about 12 inches long. One of the slash marks was about 7 inches deep and the other was about 4 inches deep. The airplane came to rest on a heading of about 160 degrees with the left wing against the telephone pole. A postimpact fire ensued.

(Cessna 172R pictured in file photo. Not accident airplane)

FMI: www.ntsb.gov

Advertisement

More News

Aero-News: Quote of the Day (05.20.22)

"For the past 75 years, the spirit of innovation has driven the U.S. Air Force and enabled our Airmen to Fly, Fight and Win. As we celebrate our historic milestone, we are proud to>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Linx (05.20.22)

Aero Linx: European Helicopter Association (EHA) EHA’s goal is to be the single voice of the European rotorcraft industry by all its stakeholders, including manufacturers; op>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Term (05.20.22): Lost Communications

Lost Communications Loss of the ability to communicate by radio. Aircraft are sometimes referred to as NORDO (No Radio). Standard pilot procedures are specified in 14 CFR Part 91. >[...]

Airborne-Flight Training 05.19.22: Republic SIC, USAF Kolligian, Pilot Shortage

Also: Bob Hoover Legacy Foundation, Women’s Air Race Classic, NIFA SAFECON 2022, Oshkosh Pilot Proficiency Center For some time, Republic Airways has enjoyed a not so favorab>[...]

Airborne 05.16.22: Enstrom Bought-Again, Republic v FAA, NTSB Blames FAA

Also: FAA Funds Airport Improvements, WAI Membership Changes, USCG On Launches, United Airlines Chuck Surack, founder of Surack Enterprises, has announced that he has purchased The>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2022 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC