ESPN Recruited For Military UAV Video Analysis | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Airborne On ANN

Airborne 08.22.16

Airborne 08.23.16

Airborne 08.24.16

Airborne 08.25.16

Airborne 08.26.16

Airborne Hi-Def On YouTube

Airborne 08.22.16

Airborne 08.23.16

Airborne 08.24.16

Airborne 08.25.16

Airborne 08.26.16

Tweet Us The Coolest Things You See @OSH16!
#OSH16Coolest!

It's Alive!: AirVenture 2016 Innovation Preview on Vimeo!

It's Alive!: AirVenture 2016 Innovation Preview on YouTube!

Wed, Dec 26, 2012

ESPN Recruited For Military UAV Video Analysis

Helping To Train Analysts To Sift Through 'Enormous Amount' Of Video From Drones

Anyone who's ever watched a sporting event ... at least with any knowledge of the broadcasting industry ... has been impressed with the ability of a producer to pinpoint multiple angles of a play to be shown almost immediately in instant replay as the announcers analyze the action. That skill has also caught the attention of the U.S. military, which has an enormous amount of footage coming in daily from drone flights over places like Afghanistan.

How much video? The military reports that the services received over 327-thousand hours of raw video last year. The amount was just under 5,000 hours in 2001.

That requires people to stare at monitors for hours and days at a time, trying to make sense of what they see. In an effort to help train its people to discern the unusual from the ordinary, the Air Force has turned to ESPN to learn how it deals with the large amount of video which comes in during sporting events.

USA Today reports that while there have been no technological breakthroughs from working with ESPN producers, they have been able to help train analysts and develop expertise. And Retired Air Force Lieutenant General David Deptula, now a senior military scholar at the Air Force Academy, said that such skills are critical. "You can't catch bad guys unless you know where the are and what they're doing," he said.

But the analysts have not, as far as we know, been given access to a telestrator.

(Predator drone image from file)

FMI: www.af.mil

Advertisement

More News

Airborne 08.26.16: Citation Longitude Update, Falcon 9 Display, N Shore Heli Rte

Also: Aerosim Scholarship, Santa Monica Nonsense, Marine One, UAV Developer Kit, FAA Penalty, F-35 Weapons Test, Coastal Helicopters The Cessna Citation Longitude moves closer to i>[...]

Another Tough Weekend For Airshows... Two Pilots Lost

Accidents in Oregon and China Take Lives It's been a lousy weekend to be an aviation journalist as we document the tragic loss of two well-known pilots in two separate airshows acc>[...]

Aero-News: Quote of the Day (08.28.16)

"This is the perfect natural laboratory to study aerosol-cloud interactions, which are some of the largest uncertainties in the prediction of future climate." Source: Jens Redemann>[...]

NASA Flies To Africa to Study Climate Effects Of Smoke On Clouds

Two Research Aircraft Head To Namibia Because Of Its Unique Climate NASA scientists and two research aircraft are on their way to a unique natural laboratory off the Atlantic coast>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Linx (08.28.16)

Aero Linx: Aviators Model Code Of Conduct Innovative tools advancing aviation safety and offering a vision of excellence for aviators, the AMCC is for use by aviation practitioners>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2016 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC