ESPN Recruited For Military UAV Video Analysis | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Airborne On ANN

Airborne 03.30.15

Airborne 03.31.15

Airborne 04.01.15

Airborne 03.26.15

Airborne 03.27.15

Airborne Hi-Def On YouTube

Airborne 03.30.15

Airborne 03.31.15

Airborne 04.01.15

Airborne 03.26.15

Airborne 03.27.15

 

Wed, Dec 26, 2012

ESPN Recruited For Military UAV Video Analysis

Helping To Train Analysts To Sift Through 'Enormous Amount' Of Video From Drones

Anyone who's ever watched a sporting event ... at least with any knowledge of the broadcasting industry ... has been impressed with the ability of a producer to pinpoint multiple angles of a play to be shown almost immediately in instant replay as the announcers analyze the action. That skill has also caught the attention of the U.S. military, which has an enormous amount of footage coming in daily from drone flights over places like Afghanistan.

How much video? The military reports that the services received over 327-thousand hours of raw video last year. The amount was just under 5,000 hours in 2001.

That requires people to stare at monitors for hours and days at a time, trying to make sense of what they see. In an effort to help train its people to discern the unusual from the ordinary, the Air Force has turned to ESPN to learn how it deals with the large amount of video which comes in during sporting events.

USA Today reports that while there have been no technological breakthroughs from working with ESPN producers, they have been able to help train analysts and develop expertise. And Retired Air Force Lieutenant General David Deptula, now a senior military scholar at the Air Force Academy, said that such skills are critical. "You can't catch bad guys unless you know where the are and what they're doing," he said.

But the analysts have not, as far as we know, been given access to a telestrator.

(Predator drone image from file)

FMI: www.af.mil

Advertisement

More News

04.01.15 Special: New Apple Watch May Eliminate Medical Exams For Airline Pilots

Combining The Capabilities Of Apple Technology And ADS-B Out May Replace Airline Pilot Medicals, But There Could Be A Catch ANN's April 1 "April Fool" Special Edition As the Pilots>[...]

04.01.15 Special: Inhofe -- Media Reporting On Aviation Should Be Knowledgeable

Proposes Legislation To Have Journalists Pass A Basic Written Exam ANN’s April 1 “April Fools” Special Edition Senator James Inhofe (R-OK) has proposed legislatio>[...]

04.01.15 Special: Regional Airline Looks To Undocumented Immigrants

Carrier Says Americans Unwilling To Take The Jobs At What It Can Afford To Pay ANN’s April 1 “April Fool” Edition It may just be the tip of the iceberg, but Repub>[...]

04.01.15 Special: Roscosmos Sues Boeing, SpaceX

Tries To Prevent Launches From Returning To American Soil The Russian Space Agency Roscosmos has filed a lawsuit in a Russian court against Boeing and SpaceX, saying the two U.S. c>[...]

Airborne 04.01.15: April 1st Special Episode!, David Bowie In Space, New TBirds!

Also: Inhofe Demands Media Aero-Accountability, "Super Duper" Cub, RANS' Exclusive WalMart Deal, Obama To Keep Air Force One, Cessna Bringing Back Bamboo Bomber Pop-star legend, Da>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2015 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC