Air Force: Drone Accident Rate At Civilian Airports 'Unacceptably High' | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

Airborne Unlimited-
Monday

Airborne-Unmanned w/AUVSI-
Tuesday

Airborne Unlimited-
Wednesday

AMA Drone Report-
Thursday

Airborne Unlimited-
Friday

Airborne On ANN

Airborne Unlimited-10-22-18

Airborne Unmanned-10-23-18

Airborne Unlimited-10.24.18

Airborne Unlimited-10.18.18

Airborne Unlimited-10.19.18

Airborne-YouTube

Airborne Unlimited-10-22-18

Airborne Unmanned-10-23-18

Airborne Unlimited-10.24.18

Airborne Unlimited-10.18.18

Airborne Unlimited-10.19.18

Wed, Dec 12, 2012

Air Force: Drone Accident Rate At Civilian Airports 'Unacceptably High'

Pilot Error, Software Issues, Mechanical Failures All Cited As Causes

Internal Air Force investigation reports indicate that the service is losing drones at an unacceptably high rate at civilian airports similar to an accident which occurred in the Seychelles in April. In that accident, an inexperienced operator flying an MQ-9 Reaper (similar aircraft pictured in USAF photo) launched the aircraft without permission, mishandled the flight controls, and wound up crashing it onto the runway without its landing gear deployed. It skidded into the ocean off the end of the runway.

In an enterprise report in the Washington Post, documents obtained through a Freedom of Information Act request show that there have been numerous accidents involving military UAVs at civilian airports over the past two years. The reports consistently cite pilot error, software issues, mechanical failures, and inadequate coordination with civilian air traffic controllers in the accidents.

The paper reports that there have been numerous instances of Predator and Reaper accidents occurring near non-military airports, sometimes with civilian contractors operating the aircraft. Some have been under the auspices of the CIA, which is basing UAVs at a civilian airport in Ethiopia for missions over Somalia.

The accidents have not gone unnoticed by those expressing concerns about the FAA's plan to allow the operation of unmanned aircraft in the National Air Space (NAS). The Air Force says the accident rate is declining as the technology matures, and that the incident rate is now comparable to that of the service's fleet of F-16 fighter jets at a similar stage of development.

FMI: www.af.mil

Advertisement

More News

Airborne 10.22.18: Terrafugia Taking Orders, Pilot Vindicated, Airborne Staff

Also: Rocket Lab Selects Wallops, Corporate Angel Network, Airbus Helicopters, Air Force Funding International media reports have confirmed that deliveries of the Terrafugia &lsquo>[...]

Airborne 10.22.18: Terrafugia Taking Orders, Pilot Vindicated, Airborne Staff

Also: Rocket Lab Selects Wallops, Corporate Angel Network, Airbus Helicopters, Air Force Funding International media reports have confirmed that deliveries of the Terrafugia &lsquo>[...]

Aero-Help Wanted: ANN REALLY Needs A Sales Pro

ANN/Airborne/Aero-TV Marketing Department Needs Part or Full Time Personnel E-I-C Note: For some reason, finding really motivated/honest/professional sales help has been a tough gi>[...]

Expert Help Wanted: Could YOU Be The Next Face Of 'Airborne?'

Aviation's Longest Running Video News Program Is Seeking New Talent For Airborne Expansion ANN is on the hunt for next new face of our Airborne news program series... in order to a>[...]

AMA Drone Report 10.11.18: MultiGP/DRL Join Up, Hurricane Warning, EAA Support

Also: Airspace Authorization Expire?, MOSAIC Proposal, New LAANC Providers, FAA Targets UAS Violators The 2018 MultiGP Drone Racing Championship and 2019 DRL Swatch Tryouts eSports>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2018 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC