Colorado Supreme Court Ends 'Quiet Skies' Legal Battle | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

Airborne Unlimited-
Monday

Airborne-Unmanned w/AUVSI-
Tuesday

Airborne Unlimited-
Wednesday

AMA Drone Report-
Thursday

Airborne Unlimited-
Friday

Airborne On ANN

Airborne 02.12.18

Airborne-UnManned 02.13.18

Airborne 02.14.18

AMA Drone Report 02.15.18

Airborne 02.16.18

Airborne-YouTube

Airborne 02.12.18

Airborne-UnManned 02.13.18

Airborne 02.14.18

AMA Drone Report 02.15.18

Airborne 02.16.18

Thu, Oct 05, 2017

Colorado Supreme Court Ends 'Quiet Skies' Legal Battle

Declines To Hear The Case Brought Against Mile-Hi Skydiving

The long legal battle fought by "Citizens for Quiet Skies" against Mile-Hi Skydiving in Longmont, Colorado has finally run its course. The Colorado Supreme Court has declined to review the case, which has was first filed in 2013.

The "Citizens for Quiet Skies" is a small group of local residents who complained about the noise from the airplane used by Mile-Hi Skydiving. They said that the planes did not follow federal and local noise abatement procedures in the conduct of its normal business, and sued the company and its owner, Frank Casares, in October, 2013,

The Longmont Times-Call newspaper reports that the first legal defeat for "Citizens for Quiet Skies" came in May 2015, when Boulder District Court Judge Judith LaBuda ruled that Mile-Hi Skydiving had followed the rules and was in compliance with all local and federal regulations. She awarded $120,000 in damages and legal fees to Casares.

But the group continued to fight the case. At the Colorado Court of Appeals, they said that Judge LaBuda's ruling was "very vindictive and unreasonable." That court also sided with Casares, so Kimberly Gibbs, who was spearheading the effort with her husband and a handful of others, appealed to the Colorado Supreme Court. That court declined to hear the case without comment.

Gibbs, who claims her supporters number "in the hundreds", said that the appeal to the state supreme court was in line with her commitment to see the case through to a conclusion. She said that the group will not disband, but will continue to lobby elected officials at the local and federal level in an effort to change national aviation laws and give local communities more control over GA airports.

FMI: Original Report

Advertisement

More News

Airborne-Unmanned 02.13.18: FAA UAS Symposium, Airbus Delivers, Manned EHANG 184

Also: UAS Pilot Code, FAA Drone Program, SkyWatch Funding, Quantix Hybrid UAS For Farmers The FAA and AUVSI will co-host the 3rd Annual FAA Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Symposiu>[...]

AMA Drone Report 02.15.18: AMA Expo East, Skydio R1, TSB Canada Report

Also: DJI Knowledge Quiz, GoFly Competition, Drone ID Rules Coming, FAA Unenthusiastic About Prosecuting? The Academy of Model Aeronautics will host the annual AMA Expo East at the>[...]

Airborne 02.14.18: PC-24 Delivered!, Another Icon Sinks, Replica Apollo Computer

Also: LEAP Engine, Gogo AVANCE L3, DC Small Aircraft Detection, 2017 Airline Bumping Rate In a ceremony held at Pilatus Business Aircraft Ltd in Broomfield, CO, the first productio>[...]

Airborne 02.16.18: R66 Wire-Strike Protection, Elk v Helo, Trump Budget

Also: Red Bull Picks Hartzell, SNC Dream Chaser, CH-53K Demo's Vehicle Lift, Emirates Firms Up A380 Orders Robinson has added wire strike protection provisions to its R66 options l>[...]

Airborne 02.16.18: R66 Wire-Strike Protection, Elk v Helo, Trump Budget

Also: Red Bull Picks Hartzell, SNC Dream Chaser, CH-53K Demo's Vehicle Lift, Emirates Firms Up A380 Orders Robinson has added wire strike protection provisions to its R66 options l>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2018 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC