MCAS New River Makes Airfield Updates | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

Airborne Unlimited-Monday

Airborne Unmanned

Airborne Unlimited-Wednesday Airborne Flight Training

Airborne Unlimited-
Friday

Airborne-ANN Airborne Unlimited--01.25.21 Airborne-Unmanned--01.26.20 Airborne Unlimited--01.21.21 Airborne-Flight Training--01.14.20 Airborne Unlimited--01.22.21

Airborne On YouTube

Airborne Unlimited--01.25.21

Airborne-Unmanned--01.26.20

Airborne Unlimited--01.21.21 Airborne-Flight Training--01.14.20

Airborne Unlimited--01.22.21

Mon, Jan 11, 2021

MCAS New River Makes Airfield Updates

Will Enhance Mission Readiness And Increase Safety For Marines

To enhance mission capabilities and ensure the highest safety standards for mission readiness, Marine Corps Air Station New River is in the final stages of completing significant upgrades and renovations to its airfield.

According to Pat Edwards, airfield operations officer and manager on MCAS New River, the base is finishing up an eight-month project that included milling and repaving roughly 4,790 feet of runway and installing 25, 4x4 Light Emitting Diode panels to the hangars as a part of an enhanced Lightning Warning system.

“We have had a lot of technological advances in aircraft, and it is our job to keep pace on the installation level,” said Lt. Col. Roger Holliday, director of installations and environmental on MCAS New River. “It will keep all of the runway and taxiways serviceable so that Marines meet their flight hours and training goals.”

According to Holliday, both aircraft groups and station operations worked seamlessly to keep operations running during the runway refilling and repaving process.

The last renovations to the runway were conducted around 15 years ago, and with the current renovations it is anticipated to last another 10 to 15 years of utilization with no interruptions and little to no maintenance required. This will allow Marines to use the entirety of the air space for training.

“The squadrons played a big role in the success of the project,” Edwards said. “Their patience and willingness to adapt to the situation allowed the contractors to provide work that will add to the value of the airfield for their training.”

According to Holliday, with an energy saving initiative and a budget of roughly $9 million, the base is also updating approximately 1,200 incandescent runway and taxi marker lights with LED replacements, as the life cycle of the LEDs are longer and cost a fraction of what incandescent lights cost, effectively saving energy and money for the Marine Corps.

“When we were in the development of the LED replacement project, we had a shortfall in our ability to quickly warn everyone that there was lightning within five nautical miles of the airfield,” Holliday said. “This is the distance at which everyone is required to evacuate the flight line into the hangars for their safety. We wanted to have an effective way of communicating to Marines and reduce notification time.”

The new Lightning Warning system will provide Marines anywhere on the flight line proper and prompt notification of lightning up to five miles away. When the personnel are notified of lightning within five miles, they will be able to flip a switch that will cause the LED lights to blink and be visible from anywhere on the fight line. The goal of the warning system is to ensure Marines who maintain the aircraft stay safe and can properly shelter in the event of destructive weather.

“We have had a lot of technological advances in aircraft, so we have to keep pace here on the installation level by keeping all of the runway and taxiways serviceable so that Marines meet their flight hours and training goals. Our utilities and information technology has to advance as well to be able to support the new advanced aircraft we are introducing,” said Holliday. "Being able to keep the technology of the air station current allows us to support technologically-advanced aircraft that we have today. It also allows us to look at the horizon to see what is coming tomorrow.”

FMI: www.marines.mil

Advertisement

More News

ANN's Daily Aero-Linx (01.24.21)

Aero Linx: Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities -- Statewide Aviation Aviation touches all aspects of life in rural Alaska, and is a basic mode of transportati>[...]

Aero-News: Quote of the Day (01.24.21)

“We explored a number of alternatives, but after careful consideration, we simply cannot execute a worthwhile event that would not potentially endanger both the community and>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Term (01.24.21): Hazardous Weather Information

Hazardous Weather Information Summary of significant meteorological information (SIGMET/WS), convective significant meteorological information (convective SIGMET/WST), urgent pilot>[...]

Airborne 01.25.21: Electric Velis, Whitehouse Moon Rock, Drone Chutes

Also: Bryant S-76B Crash Hearing, AeroEducate Initiative, Liberty University, Sustainable Fuels Pipistrel-USA reports that over the course of 2020, Pipistrel delivered 111 certifie>[...]

Airborne 01.22.21: Aero-Friedrichshafen Postponed, ASR SBX Chute, Airbus Update

Also: Partial Aero-Recovery in 2021?, Bell 412, 15 More KC-46 Tankers, Super Bowl LV v Drones Another major aviation event has had to give way to the damage done by the COVID pande>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2021 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC