Aircraft Owners: Blame The Weather | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Airborne On ANN

Airborne 06.27.16

Airborne 06.28.16

Airborne 06.29.16

Airborne 06.30.16

Airborne 07.01.16

Airborne Hi-Def On YouTube

Airborne 06.27.16

Airborne 06.28.16

Airborne 06.29.16

Airborne 06.30.16

Airborne 07.01.16

AEA2016 LIVE Aero-TV: 04/27-0830ET, 04/28-1400ET, 04/29-1100ET

Sun 'n Fun 2016 Innovation Preview on Vimeo!

Sun 'n Fun 2016 Innovation Preview on YouTube!

Thu, Feb 10, 2005

Aircraft Owners: Blame The Weather

Say Blizzard-Like Conditions Brought Down 737-200

The Afghan owners of a Boeing 737-200 that went down east of Kabul a week ago blame the weather. The accident killed all 104 passengers and crew, whose remains are at a mountain site more than 11,000 feet above sea level.

"The plane crashed in Kabul due to bad weather and not safety issues, said a manager at Phoenix Aviation, owner of Kam Air. "It was unfortunate, but it was not our fault." He was quoted by Reuters.

As a precaution, however, Kam Air has reportedly suspended its lease on another 737 in the wake of last Thursday's accident.

"It's more a precaution than anything else," said Charles Vincent. He's the UN's World Food Program representative in Kabul. "It's normal procedure after a plane crash to review the safety of the plane and the company that supplies it. It's for the clients' peace of mind," he told Reuters.

But is that true? Not according to that manager at Phoenix, who didn't want to be identified. He told the wire service that the UAE-based company had expected its contract with the UN and, in turn, with Kam Air, would be trashed because of "management problems."

The Kam Air 737-200 (file photo of type, right) was on its way from Herat to Kabul when it was turned away because of bad weather and the lack of a precision approach at the capital's airport. It fell off radar in high mountains about 20-miles east of Kabul. US officials who run the Bagram Air Base north of Kabul said they received no request from the 737's crew for permission to land there.

FMI: www.flykamair.com

Advertisement

More News

Airborne 06.30.16: 7000th Citation, C Series Order, John Glenn Honored

Also: Solid Rocket Motor Test, OSH16 Coverage!, Ducted Fan, Welsh Farewell, Blue Origin, Boeing-Farnborough, European TBM 930 Cessna has delivered the first fractional Cessna Citat>[...]

Airborne 06.29.16: SWA Delays Max, McConnell OKs B29-Doc, AAL Trashes Cameras

Also: Flytenow V Supreme Ct, Electric eSpyder, F-35 Adir, IL AirShow, NJ AvTax, FAI Young Artist, Unregistered Airplane To survive in the airline business it is sometimes necessary>[...]

Airborne 06.30.16: 7000th Citation, C Series Order, John Glenn Honored

Also: Solid Rocket Motor Test, OSH16 Coverage!, Ducted Fan, Welsh Farewell, Blue Origin, Boeing-Farnborough, European TBM 930 Cessna has delivered the first fractional Cessna Citat>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Linx (07.01.16)

FAA Repair Station Locator Need to find a certified repair station near you? This FAA resource allows you to search by state and type of repair needed to provide you with your opti>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Term (07.01.16): Terminal VFR Radar Service

A national program instituted to extend the terminal radar services provided instrument flight rules (IFR) aircraft to visual flight rules (VFR) aircraft.>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2016 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC