H75, H85 Turboprop Engines Receive EASA Engine Certifications | Aero-News Network
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Wed, Nov 21, 2012

H75, H85 Turboprop Engines Receive EASA Engine Certifications

Larger Engine Will Power CAIGA's Primus 150 Airplane

GE Aviation’s new H75 and H85 turboprop engines received engine type certification from the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA). The two new engines are derivatives of the H80 engine. Last week, the China Aviation Industry General Aircraft (CAIGA) selected GE Aviation’s new H85 turboprop engine to power its five-seat Primus 150 business aircraft. This is the first application for the H85 turboprop engine.

GE is proud to certify three new turboprop engines in less than a year,” said Jim Stoker, president and managing executive of GE Aviation's Business and General Aviation Turboprops. “The H80 family of engines offers customers a range of horsepower with advanced material and technology, and the engines are generating significant customer interest.”

The H75 engine is rated at 750 shaft horsepower (shp) for takeoff and maximum continuous operation, and the H85 engine is rated at 850 shp. Like the H80 engine, the H75 and H85 engines are aimed at the agricultural, commuter, utility and business turboprop aircraft segments. U.S. Federal Aviation Administration type certification of the H75 and H85 is anticipated next year.

The H80 engine entered service in October on the Thrush 510G agricultural aircraft. The engine also was selected to power the Aircraft Industries L410 commuter aircraft, which is expected to enter service early next year.

The H80 turboprop engine family incorporates GE's 3-D aerodynamic design techniques and advanced materials to create a powerful, fuel-efficient, durable engine with no recurrent fuel nozzle inspections and no hot section inspection. The engines feature a service life of 3,600 flight-hours or 6,600 cycles between overhauls. The H80 engine family also offers a standard auto start and limiting unit to simplify engine start-up as well as a choice of propeller governors to allow customers flexibility in propeller selection.

(Primus 150 image provided by CAIGA)

FMI: www.geaviation.com

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