NTSB Prelim Indicates A36 Bonanza Lost Power On Takeoff From Tupelo, MS | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

** Airborne/NBAA2014 10.22.14 ** HD iPad-Friendly -- Airborne/NBAA2014 10.22.14 **
** Airborne/NBAA2014 10.21.14 ** HD iPad-Friendly -- Airborne/NBAA2014 10.21.14 **
** Airborne/NBAA2014 10.20.14 ** HD iPad-Friendly -- Airborne/NBAA2014 10.20.14 **

Mon, Aug 12, 2013

NTSB Prelim Indicates A36 Bonanza Lost Power On Takeoff From Tupelo, MS

Pilot Was Able To Walk Away From The Off-Airport Forced Landing

The NTSB has released a preliminary report from an accident which occurred in Tupelo, MS July 20 involving an A36 Bonanza. The pilot was able to walk away from the forced landing in a field near the airport.

According to the report, 0n July 20, 2013, about 1309 eastern daylight time, a Beech A36, N117HB, experienced a total loss of engine power while on approach for landing at Tupelo Regional Airport (TUP), Tupelo, Mississippi. The pilot subsequently made a forced landing impacting the ground prior to the intended landing runway. The private pilot sustained minor injuries. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing and forward portion of the fuselage. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed for the flight that originated from Birmingham-Shuttlesworth International Airport (BHM), Birmingham, Alabama about 1200.

According to the pilot, he had departed TUP earlier in the day and flew direct to BHM. When returning to TUP, while on final approach to runway 18, the engine lost power about 600 feet above ground level. The airplane impacted the ground in an off airport open field, bounced back into the air, crossed a road, and landed inside the airport perimeter fence. Once the airplane came to rest, the pilot turned the ignition switch to “OFF” and exited the airplane.

According to first responders, the fuel selector valve was selected to the left fuel tank position and fuel was observed leaking from the left wing. According to photographs provided by the airport authority, blue fluid was evident on the underside of the left wing and the left wing’s flap.

According to fuel records, on June 30, 2013, the airplane was fueled with 40.3 gallons of aviation fuel.

Initial examination by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that the airplane came to rest approximately 1400 feet prior to the beginning of the displaced threshold for runway 18. The initial impact location was approximately 800 feet prior to where the airplane had come to rest.

(A36 Bonanza pictured in file photo. Not accident airplane)

FMI: www.ntsb.gov

Advertisement

More News

Airborne at NBAA-10.22.14: Legacy 500, Universal InSight, BendixKing AeroWave

Also: GE Honda, Sagem's Active SideStick, Syberjet Update, Techno Aerospace Knows How to Party The FAA handed over certification papers for Embraer's Legacy 500 executive jet durin>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Linx (10.24.14)

Homebuilt Homepage: Clubs And Newsletters This page lists Homebuilt related Clubs and Newsletters.>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Term (10.24.14): Phase Separation – Aviation Fuel

Phase separation is when a combined liquid separates into two different liquids and may occur when autogas is used for aviation fuel.>[...]

Aero-News: Quote Of The Day (10.24.14)

“I’m excited and humbled by the trust that the ALPA Board of Directors has placed in me with this election.” Source: ALPA President-Elect Tim Canoll.>[...]

ANN FAQ: Q&A 101

A Few Questions AND Answers To Help You Get MORE Out of ANN!>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2014 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC