'Four More Years' to Study Grand Canyon | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Airborne On ANN

Holiday

Airborne 05.31.16

Airborne 06.01.16

Airborne 05.26.16

Airborne 05.27.16

Airborne Hi-Def On YouTube

Holiday

Airborne 05.31.16

Airborne 06.01.16

Airborne 05.26.16

Airborne 05.27.16

AEA2016 LIVE Aero-TV: 04/27-0830ET, 04/28-1400ET, 04/29-1100ET

Sun 'n Fun 2016 Innovation Preview on Vimeo!

Sun 'n Fun 2016 Innovation Preview on YouTube!

Fri, Mar 07, 2003

'Four More Years' to Study Grand Canyon

It Took A Long Time to Make the Canyon, Too.

It took a long time to make the Grand Canyon, with the Colorado River's gradual sloshing away of the Coconino sandstone; and it would have taken twice as long, apparently, if the FAA had been involved.

The bureaucracy needs four more years, at least, they say, to "study" the effects of aircraft noise. By that time, of course, everyone will be more-acclimatized to the regulation; and most of those pesky tour operators will be out of business.

The AOPA says the latest rule maintains "status-quo" until at least February 20, 2006, to give FAA more time to review guidance on measuring noise in the park and to determine how to address non-air tour aircraft noise. While the current rule has no direct impact on general aviation pilots, there is the potential for future modifications to the east-end and west-end routes and airspace to achieve substantial restoration of natural quiet in the park.

The AOPA notes, "An August 2002 court case ruling determined that FAA noise monitoring standards are inconsistent with those of the National Park Service (NPS). The court ruled that the FAA's explanation of excluding non-tour aircraft in its noise modeling was inadequate. As a result, the FAA must now work with the NPS to develop the necessary environmental analysis and review process to help restore "natural quiet" at the Grand Canyon.

"AOPA has lead the fight to preserve general aviation access to airspace over national parks and successfully objected to parts of the rule that would have imposed greater restrictions on transient GA aircraft crossing the canyon. 'AOPA continues to maintain that transient general aviation overflights do not have a negative noise impact on our national parks,' said Melissa Bailey, AOPA vice president for air traffic, regulatory and certification policy."

FMI: www.faa.gov

Advertisement

More News

Airborne 05.27.16: More MH370 Debris, Airport 4 Sale, Hurricane Hunters

Also: PWC PW307D, Icon Scandal, Memorial Day, IASO, Nat'l Warplane Museum, Gogo Cloud, Orbital ATK, Honor Flight Austin The Australia's Minister for Infrastructure and Transport, D>[...]

Bill Gordon Lost In Hudson River P-47 Ditching

Despite What Appeared To Be A Decent Ditching Effort, An Outstanding Pilot Was Lost The airshow community has suffered its second tragedy in nearly as many weeks. Long-time warbird>[...]

TrainingPort.net Partners With AeroEx To Offer Online Training For NCC Operators

European Business Aircraft Operators Must Comply With New EASA Air Operations Covering Non-Commercial Flights By August 2016 TrainingPort.net has announced that it is partnering wi>[...]

Hawk Lead-In Fighter Fleet Reaches 100,000 Flying Hours

Aircraft Entered Service In 2001 The Australian Hawk 127 Lead-In fighter fleet has achieved 100,000 flying hours since entering service in 2001.>[...]

Frasca Flight Simulator To Be Used In Georgia Tech Research Study

Mentor AATD Will Be Configured To Simulate A Cessna 172 The Georgia Institute of Technology, (also known as Georgia Tech) Atlanta, has contracted with Frasca International, Inc. to>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2016 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC