In The Midst Of Heavy Weather, NASA Tries To Stay On Time | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

Airborne Unlimited-
Monday

Airborne-Unmanned w/AUVSI-
Tuesday

Airborne Unlimited-
Wednesday

AMA Drone Report-
Thursday

Airborne Unlimited-
Friday

Airborne On ANN

Airborne Unlimited-06.10.19

Airborne UnManned-06.11.19

Airborne Unlimited-06.12.19

AMA Drone Report-06.13.19

Airborne Unlimited-06.14.19

Airborne-YouTube

Airborne Unlimited-06.10.19

Airborne UnManned-06.11.19

Airborne Unlimited-06.12.19

AMA Drone Report-06.13.19

Airborne Unlimited-06.14.19

Sun, Sep 19, 2004

In The Midst Of Heavy Weather, NASA Tries To Stay On Time

But Hurricanes May Delay Shuttles' Return To Flight

Virtually no place in Florida has escaped nature's wrath this summer -- and that includes Cape Canaveral. Because of poundings from Hurricanes Charley and Frances, NASA is now about a week behind on its schedule for returning the space shuttles to service -- hopefully in March or April.

"Can they make that up?" asked Thomas Stafford, the Apollo astronaut who's now co-chairman of the group overseeing the return to flight. "It's too early to say. It was a tight schedule to start with, and the facility survey is still going on," he said in an interview with the Associated Press.

As we reported earlier this month, NASA took quite a bit of damage during Hurricane Frances. Much of it was sustained by the Vehicle Assembly Building (above, before Hurricane Frances), which lost thousands of square feet in siding.

Last week, work on the newly-redesigned external fuel tank, underway at the Lockheed-Martin plant near New Orleans. "The impact there is... at least a week, and that's assuming no damage from the storm," said former shuttle astronaut and task force co-chairman Richard Covey.

And, don't look now, space fans, but Jeanne is still out there, still a threat to the Space Coast.

But compared to the technical issues that still must be overcome before a return to flight, weather delays seem rather mild. So far, NASA has met five of the 15 goals set forth by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB). Repairs and modifications could cost upwards of $2.2 billion.

FMI: www.returntoflight.org

Advertisement

More News

Airborne 06.14.19: Falcon Heavy, Electric Speed Record, GPS Failure

Also: CFM56 Engine Fleet, E-175 Makes 2 Emergency Landings, E-175 Makes Two Emergency Ldgs, 737 MAX Pilots Let Go When SpaceX next launches a Falcon Heavy booster, currently set fo>[...]

Airborne 06.12.19: Belite Fire, Qantas Pilot Academy, Hummel Fly-In

Also: Purdue Aviatrixes, Astronaut Good Retires, Mitsubishi Negotiating W/Bombardier, New KGSO Tower The folks at Belite Aircraft were alerted late Friday night to a fire by local >[...]

Airborne 06.12.19: Belite Fire, Qantas Pilot Academy, Hummel Fly-In

Also: Purdue Aviatrixes, Astronaut Good Retires, Mitsubishi Negotiating W/Bombardier, New KGSO Tower The folks at Belite Aircraft were alerted late Friday night to a fire by local >[...]

ANNouncement: Now Accepting Applications For Oshkosh 2019 Stringers!!!

An Amazing Experience Awaits The Chosen Few... E-I-C Note: There's very little we can say yet, but there is a reason why this may be a TRULY exciting year to throw in with ANN to c>[...]

ANN Social Media Program (ANN-SMP) Expanded For Oshkosh 2019!

ANN Keeps Pushing Aviation Media (Kicking and Screaming) Further Into The 21st Century... ANN is, again, radically updating its social media campaign for the upcoming 2019 Oshkosh >[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2019 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC