Aero-News Alert: Snowbird Mid-Air! | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

Airborne Unlimited-
Monday

Airborne-Unmanned w/AUVSI-
Tuesday

Airborne Unlimited-
Wednesday

AMA Drone Report-
Thursday

Airborne Unlimited-
Friday

Airborne On ANN

Airborne 11.20.17

Airborne-Unmanned 11.21.17

Airborne 11.22.17

AMA Drone Report 11.16.17

Airborne 11.17.17

Airborne-YouTube

Airborne 11.20.17

Airborne-Unmanned 11.21.17

Airborne 11.22.17

AMA Drone Report 11.16.17

Airborne 11.17.17

Sat, Dec 11, 2004

Aero-News Alert: Snowbird Mid-Air!

One Pilot Lost, The Other Ejected

The bad news seems to be coming fast and furious, of late. Two members of Canada's famed Snowbird Flight Demonstration Team were involved in a mid air collision Friday at approximately 1000, local time.

As a result, one pilot has been killed, while the other is reported alive (with minor injuries), after a successful ejection. Killed in a "routine" training flight, Capt. Miles Selby, 31, of Tsawwassen, B.C., was a two-year veteran of the Snowbirds and had flown CF-18 fighter jets during combat missions in Kosovo. Capt. Chuck Mallett, 35, of Edmonton, was reported alive after an ejection from his CT-114 Tutor demonstration aircraft.

The accident took place near Mossbank, some 65 km south of 15 Wing, the Snowbirds' home base in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan. All flight training operations are currently suspended pending an investigation of the collision. Tragically; this accident occurs exactly six years after the mid-air in which Snowbird Pilot, Capt. Michael VandenBos, lost his life in 1998. VandenBos was part of a six-ship formation when a mid-air disabled his aircraft. While he was able to eject, VandenBos was fatally injured in the accident.

Capt. Miles Selby

Lost in Friday's tragic midair, Captain Miles Selby, 31, from Tsawwassen, British Columbia, was in his second year with the Snowbirds. During the 2004 show season, he flew the No. 4 jet and was to fly the No. 8 aircraft as the Opposing Solo.

He joined the Canadian Forces in 1991 under the Regular Officer Training Plan (ROTP) and graduated from Royal Roads Military College in 1995. After receiving his wings, Capt. Selby was selected for fighter pilot training and was subsequently posted to 416 Tactical Fighter Squadron in Cold Lake, Alberta, where he flew the CF-18 Hornet. In 1999, Capt. Selby flew several operational missions in the Kosovo Conflict and returned the following year to fly peacekeeping missions over the Balkans.

In the summer of 2001, Capt. Selby was posted to 441 Tactical Fighter Squadron in Cold Lake, Alberta, remaining on the CF-18 Hornet. He attended the Tactical Leadership Program flying course in Florennes, Belgium and then completed his Mass Attack Lead Upgrade in 2002. Capt. Selby brought over 2,650 hours of military flying experience to the 2005 team.

Capt. Chuck Mallett

Reported to have survived with minor injuries, Capt. Mallett joined the Canadian Forces in 1991 under the Officer Candidate Training Plan (OCTP) and graduated with a diploma in Aviation Science from Mount Royal College in Calgary in 1995. After receiving his wings in 1996, he was posted to 2 Canadian Forces Flying Training School (2 CFFTS) in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, as a flying instructor on the CT-114 Tutor.

In 1999, he was posted to the Flying Instructor’s School in Moose Jaw, and was subsequently selected for the initial cadre of instructors to help with the transition from the Tutor to the CT-156 Harvard II, the NATO Flying Training in Canada (NFTC) Program's new training aircraft. Overall, he accumulated over 900 instructional flying hours and achieved an A2 Instructional Category.

Capt. Mallett was posted to 431 (AD) Squadron in 2002 as a standards pilot, and a member of the Snowbirds’ home team. Capt. Mallett brings over 3,350 hours of military flying experience to the 2005 team.

Canadair CT-114 Tutor

According to the Canadian Forces, the Snowbirds' Canadair CT-114 Tutor, was used as their basic pilot training aircraft until 2000. The Tutor weighs approximately 7170 lbs, and is powered by a J-85 engine producing 2,700 pounds of thrust. Top speed of the aircraft, with smoke tanks attached, is 412 knots.

The basic Tutor is only slightly modified for use by the Snowbirds. Modifications include: a smoke generating system, a unique paint scheme for added crowd appeal, and a highly tuned engine to enhance engine response in low level flying. With its high maneuverability (with exceptionally pleasant control harmonies) and relatively slow speed, the CF notes that Tutor is ideally suited to the formation and aerobatic roles of the Snowbirds.

Canadian Forces Statement: Snowbirds Pilot Killed in Aircraft Collision

One Canadian Forces Snowbirds pilot was killed and another was injured today when their two CT-114 Tutor aircraft collided during a routine training flight near Mossbank, SK.

Captain Miles Selby, age 31 from Tsawassen, BC, is the sixth Snowbirds pilot killed in the performance of his duties in the 35 year history of the team.

Captain Chuck Mallett, age 35 from Edmonton, AB, survived the collision and is recovering in hospital with minor injuries.

"It is with great sadness that I learned today of the death of Capt Miles Selby," said Gen Ray Henault, Chief of the Defence Staff. "I extend my most heartfelt condolences to Capt Selby's wife, Julie, and family. I also extend my condolences to the Snowbirds, the military community in Moose Jaw, and the Air Force. My thoughts and prayers are with the Snowbirds and their broader family in Moose Jaw, who I know will come together to provide support to Capt Selby's wife and family in the coming days."

“The men and women of the Snowbirds team represent some of our very best people,” said LGen Ken Pennie, Chief of the Air Staff. “This is truly a sad loss for the Air Force, the Canadian Forces, and for all Canadians. We will remember and honour Capt Selby by carrying on the proud tradition of service and professionalism in Canada 's Air Force.”

The cause of the crash is not known at this time, and will be determined by a flight safety investigation.

ANN Note: Having flown and worked with the Snowbirds for many years, we know well how incredibly talented these pilots are, and how intensely unforgiving is the environment in which they operate... we extend our condolences and prayers to all those affected by this tragedy. -- Jim Campbell, ANN E-I-C 

We'll have more information as soon as we verify it...

FMI: http://www.snowbirds.dnd.ca/

Advertisement

More News

Airborne 11.22.17: AOPA Plays Icon Apologist, Lancair Mako, Mooney Ovation Ultra

Also: Airbus A380 Deal, Acting PM Belize In A/C Accident, Hartzell Propeller, Crop Duster Shooting ANN’s senior editorial staff was stunned to read a recent article by the AO>[...]

Airborne-Unmanned 11.21.17: Resolute Eagle UAS, Aerotain Skye, Novus Unmanned 17

Also: Mars Drone, ASTM Drones Standards, Huerta Reflects On His Tenure, UAS Delivers Acceptance Letters On Nov. 8, PAE ISR’s Resolute Eagle UAS completed its first commercial>[...]

ANN Wishes Our Readers, Listeners And Viewers A VERY Happy Thanksgiving Holiday

Yes... We Will Be On A Holiday Schedule For The Rest Of Week As the Aero-News staff observes the US holiday of Thanksgiving on Thursday, we wanted to let our readers know that ANN >[...]

Airborne 11.22.17: AOPA Plays Icon Apologist, Lancair Mako, Mooney Ovation Ultra

Also: Airbus A380 Deal, Acting PM Belize In A/C Accident, Hartzell Propeller, Crop Duster Shooting ANN’s senior editorial staff was stunned to read a recent article by the AO>[...]

Aero-News: Quote of the Day (11.23.17)

"We take great pride in our Goodyear Blimp crews teaming up with the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve to support Toys for Tots." Source: Paul Fitzhenry, senior vice president, Global Comm>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2017 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC