Javelin Flies Higher, Faster After Improvements | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

** Airborne 11.26.14 ** HD iPad-Friendly -- Airborne 11.26.14 **
** Airborne 11.24.14 ** HD iPad-Friendly -- Airborne 11.24.14 **
** Airborne 11.21.14 ** HD iPad-Friendly -- Airborne 11.21.14 **

Wed, Jul 19, 2006

Javelin Flies Higher, Faster After Improvements

Last month, Aero-News reported on a series of minor improvements Aviation Technology Group made to its Javelin two-place jet... and on Wednesday, the company told ANN the changes appear to be yielding real benefits, as the Javelin prototype successfully completed two more flight tests in July, expanding its flight test envelope to higher speeds and altitudes.

ATG reports that during the most recent flights, the Javelin's new Fowler-type flaps were extended and retracted between full-up and 20 degrees. Test pilot Kirk Kalstad retracted the landing gear immediately after takeoff and pushed the Javelin to 335 knots true airspeed (385 mph) at 15,000 feet. Later, he climbed to 20,000 feet and accelerated to 0.5 Mach. Bank angles were tested up to 45 degrees.

Testing included an assessment of the handling qualities of the aircraft, which involved longitudinal, lateral and directional stability, as well as trim effectiveness. Tests also evaluated engine characteristics and performance, and verified airspeed and altitude indicators.

"Kirk reported that the aircraft handled well throughout all test points," said Rob Fuschino, VP of Operations and chase plane pilot. "An initial data review shows no anomalies from predicted results."

Prior to the most recent test flights, the Javelin prototype underwent a series of modifications to increase wing span by 1.85 feet, as well as improve the secondary flight control systems with the addition of the Fowler flaps. Updates were also made to the canopy of the sleek jet.

ATG also updated the test aircraft's airborne instrumentation data acquisition system (DAS), along with associated transducers.

Revisions made to the DAS included improvements to the cockpit audio and video capture, as well as the addition of extra-force measurements to flight control systems. Also, several high-sensitivity transducers were added to the Pitot-static system, which improves data for aerodynamicists.  

FMI: www.avtechgroup.com

Advertisement

More News

Airborne 11.26.14: Island Air Scrooges Pilots, DC's NextGen, EAA On Stadium Flts

Also: F35C Pilots Build Time, A Sea Of Yellow Cubs, Lycoming's Dual Fuel Husky, CAP's Gold Medal, Boeing SC's First 787-9 This report could be called the story of the Grinch who st>[...]

AeroSports Update: What Is An LSA, And How Do I Know?

The Term Light Sport Aircraft (LSA) Is A Description Of An Aircraft, Not A Specific Type Of Aircraft Airworthiness Certification Anyone that holds a sport pilot certificate, or any>[...]

Airborne 11.26.14: Island Air Scrooges Pilots, DC's NextGen, EAA On Stadium Flts

Also: F35C Pilots Build Time, A Sea Of Yellow Cubs, Lycoming's Dual Fuel Husky, CAP's Gold Medal, Boeing SC's First 787-9 This report could be called the story of the Grinch who st>[...]

Aero-TV: SyberJet Update -- A Whole New Program

Fast and Agile -- The Latest Updates To The SyberJet Program Show Promise While at NBAA2014, ANN CEO and Editor-In-Chief, Jim Campbell, visited with Mark Fairchild, the general man>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Linx (11.27.14)

International Civil Aviation Organization The ICAO is a UN Specialized Agency,and a global forum for civil aviation.>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2014 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC