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Thu, Oct 17, 2013

Aero-TV: Kestrel Aircraft Update – The Airplane Progresses Toward Production

Pursuing A Challenging Course, There Is Little Doubt That Kestrel Has Much To Offer

Building the next generation of single-engine business birds ain't easy... and its a fact that Alan Klapmeier knows all too well.

But despite the difficulties involved in building a company, the airplane side of things appears to be going well... as noted in a progress report that we undertook at this year's Oshkosh 2013 festivities.

The Kestrel all-composite single-engine, turboprop aircraft is designed to carry up to 8 people at high speed over long distances to places that jets simply can't go. As an SE Turbo-Prop, the Kestrel can be far more versatile, burn less fuel, and able to maintain approach speeds at large busy airports -- yet land on short, grass or gravel strips.

The Kestrel's 1700 hp TPE331-14GR is flat-rated to 1,000 shp, enabling it to climb efficiently at more than 2,250 ft/min to a maximum altitude of 31,000 feet. With a cruising speed greater than 320 kt, the prop will turn quietly at just 1,490 rpm while the powerplant still manages to boast a 5,000 hour TBO. 

The Kestrel features one of the most sophisticated low-power ice protection systems on the market -- Cox and Company's 'Mechanical Expulsion Deicing System (EMEDS).' EMEDS removes ice by exciting electrical actuators installed under the leading edge of airfoils. The system components are mounted inside the leading edge, so they are not subjected to atmospheric and environmental hazards. This also produces lower aerodynamic drag and reduces fuel consumption. Additionally, there is nothing to service or replace. EMEDS has been implemented on hundreds of aircraft, and it is FAA/EASA FIKI certified. 

Copyright 2013, Aero-News Network, Inc., All Rights Reserved.

FMI: www.kestrel.aero, www.aero-news.net, www.aero-tv.net, www.youtube.com/aerotvnetwork, http://twitter.com/AeroNews

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