Pilot Involved In Accident Admits To Alcohol Use | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Airborne On ANN

Airborne 03.23.15

Airborne 03.24.15

Airborne 03.25.15

Airborne 03.26.15

Airborne 03.27.15

Airborne Hi-Def On YouTube

Airborne 03.23.15

Airborne 03.24.15

Airborne 03.25.15

Airborne 03.26.15

Airborne 03.27.15

Fri, May 03, 2013

Pilot Involved In Accident Admits To Alcohol Use

Plane Struck Power Line Near Dayton, OH, After Running Out Of Fuel

The pilot of a Mooney M20E which ran out of fuel and struck a power line during an emergency landing just outside Dayton, OH, on March 11 admitted that he had consumed alcohol before initiating the flight. Neither the pilot or his passenger were fatally injured in the accident.

The Dayton Daily News reports that the pilot was identified as Doug Morgan of Middletown, OH, who reportedly hangared his airplane at Hook Field (KMWO) in Middletown, which is south of Dayton. The passenger was identified as Thomas "Tom" Duncan, also of Middletown.

According to a factual report released by the NTSB, the pilot and passenger departed the airport for a local flight at night. During an approach to land at another airport, the pilot attempted to activate the runway lights via the push-to-talk radio switch in the cockpit; however, he reported the lights would not activate. The pilot then attempted to locate another airport in which he flew into class C and class D airspace without clearance.

At several points in the flight, the pilot entered instrument meteorological conditions without clearance. Subsequently, the airplane ran out of fuel, and the pilot executed a forced landing. During the forced landing, the airplane impacted power lines and brush covered terrain. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and both wings. Examination of the airplane did not reveal any preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

According to the FAA inspector, the pilot did not hold a current medical certificate or flight review, and the airplane's annual inspection was not current. The pilot admitted to emergency first responders that he had been consuming alcohol before the flight. Numerous attempts to obtain a completed Pilot/Operator Accident Report (NTSB Form 6120.1) from the pilot were unsuccessful.

(Mooney M20E pictured in file photo. Not accident airplane)

FMI: www.ntsb.gov

Advertisement

More News

For Real! HondaJet Receives Provisional TC From FAA

Next Big Step Taken In Honda's Plans For The Business Aviation Market The HondaJet has received provisional type certification (PTC) from the FAA. This achievement indicates the FA>[...]

Klyde Morris (03.30.15)

Klyde's Got Worries... Lots Of Them FMI: www.klydemorris.com>[...]

AeroSports Update: Aerobatic Powerhouse Julie Clark To Be At Sun ‘N Fun

Even The Best Airshow Performers In The World Need Sponsorships, And Julie Clark Has Just Announced She Will Be Sponsored By Tempest And Electroair At Sun-N-Fun 2015 Julie Clark Ai>[...]

Airborne 03.27.15: Cockpit Changes Announced, Maine v UAVs, NBAA v Santa Monica

Also: AirVenture Update, Barnstorming Opines On Media Aero-Reporting, NTSB Update, ERAU Scholarships, Doolittle Raiders, Tecnam P2010 The loss of Germanwings Flight 9525 due to wha>[...]

Aero-News: Quote Of The Day (03.30.15)

“EAA AirVenture creates unmatched opportunities for people to see aircraft in one place that you cannot see anywhere else in the world. It’s only fitting that on the B->[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2015 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC