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Fri, May 03, 2013

Pilot Involved In Accident Admits To Alcohol Use

Plane Struck Power Line Near Dayton, OH, After Running Out Of Fuel

The pilot of a Mooney M20E which ran out of fuel and struck a power line during an emergency landing just outside Dayton, OH, on March 11 admitted that he had consumed alcohol before initiating the flight. Neither the pilot or his passenger were fatally injured in the accident.

The Dayton Daily News reports that the pilot was identified as Doug Morgan of Middletown, OH, who reportedly hangared his airplane at Hook Field (KMWO) in Middletown, which is south of Dayton. The passenger was identified as Thomas "Tom" Duncan, also of Middletown.

According to a factual report released by the NTSB, the pilot and passenger departed the airport for a local flight at night. During an approach to land at another airport, the pilot attempted to activate the runway lights via the push-to-talk radio switch in the cockpit; however, he reported the lights would not activate. The pilot then attempted to locate another airport in which he flew into class C and class D airspace without clearance.

At several points in the flight, the pilot entered instrument meteorological conditions without clearance. Subsequently, the airplane ran out of fuel, and the pilot executed a forced landing. During the forced landing, the airplane impacted power lines and brush covered terrain. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and both wings. Examination of the airplane did not reveal any preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

According to the FAA inspector, the pilot did not hold a current medical certificate or flight review, and the airplane's annual inspection was not current. The pilot admitted to emergency first responders that he had been consuming alcohol before the flight. Numerous attempts to obtain a completed Pilot/Operator Accident Report (NTSB Form 6120.1) from the pilot were unsuccessful.

(Mooney M20E pictured in file photo. Not accident airplane)

FMI: www.ntsb.gov

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