From Amsterdam to Sydney In Three Hours | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

Airborne Unlimited-
Monday

Airborne-Unmanned w/AUVSI-
Tuesday

Airborne Unlimited-
Wednesday

AMA Drone Report-
Thursday

Airborne Unlimited-
Friday

Airborne On ANN

Airborne Unlimited-06.17.19

Airborne UnManned-06.18.19

Airborne Unlimited-06.19.19

AMA Drone Report-06.20.19

Airborne Unlimited-06.21.19

Airborne-YouTube

Airborne Unlimited-06.17.19

Airborne UnManned-06.18.19

Airborne Unlimited-06.19.19

AMA Drone Report-06.20.19

Airborne Unlimited-06.21.19

Fri, Dec 07, 2018

From Amsterdam to Sydney In Three Hours

Stratofly Project Developing Hypersonic Aircraft In The Netherlands

A hypersonic aircraft can travel at velocities up to eight times the speed of sound (i.e. Mach 8), and up to ten times faster than a present-day standard airliner. At those speeds, it would take only three hours to fly from the Netherlands to Australia. Hypersonic aircraft fly in the stratosphere, which results in less air resistance and therefore lower fuel consumption. Another advantage is that there is still ‘space’ in the stratosphere to handle increases in air traffic. Which propulsion system would be required for this type of aircraft, how do we ensure sustainable flights, and how can we safeguard passenger comfort on-board?

These and other questions are being investigated in the Stratofly project, which is coordinated by Politecnico di Torino. The project is financed by the EU’s Horizon 2020 program. The researchers are also studying whether a hypersonic test aircraft can be developed by 2035. The technologies being examined Stratofly are currently at Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 2 to 3, and will reach TRL4 by the end of the project, which runs from June 1st 2018 to year-end 2020.

NLR is a participant in the Stratofly project, which focuses on innovative hydrogen-based hybrid propulsion systems. The environmental impact will also be analyzed, including the effects of emissions on climate and the ozone layer. In addition, research will be conducted into the well-being of passengers, looking at factors such as comfort, biorhythm and safety.

One of the challenges is to reduce the noise produced by the propulsion system. NLR will conduct research into the noise generated by the so-called ‘air turborocket’ engines, which are integrated into the fuselage and eject their exhaust flow in a single joint nozzle. These engines will be used during the subsonic take-off and landing phase. At high altitudes, air turborocket engines accelerate the aircraft to speeds up to Mach 4. Propulsion is then taken over by a dual-mode ramjet or supersonic combustion ramjet (‘scramjet’) engine.

NLR will predict jet noise levels using semi-empirical models, based on data obtained from experiments with scaled engines integrated into the fuselage (without a combustion chamber). NLR assembles these engines in its in-house model workshop and also tests them in-house.

NLR research will also focus on ways to reduce the noise produced by the propulsion system. Unlike in present-day aircraft, the propulsion system of a hypersonic aircraft is not attached to a wing, but integrated into the fuselage. Using absorbent materials and installing the system in a specific location within the fuselage can theoretically make a contribution to reducing engine noise.

The Stratofly project is a first step in exploring potential new aviation routes at altitudes currently inaccessible to passenger aircraft. This will help accommodate the expected six-fold increase in global air traffic by 2050. The ultimate goal is to realize a revolutionary form of aviation that is much faster and more efficient than current modes of air travel, while simultaneously delivering better sustainability performance.

(Image provided with Netherlands Aerospace Center news release)

FMI: www.nlr.org

Advertisement

More News

Gone West: ANN Mascot Anjin G Shepherd

Dear Lord... Please Help Me To Be The Person My Dog Thinks I Am We've had a rough many weeks recently... lots to do, some medical issues that would not go away... until recently (a>[...]

ANN Social Media Program (ANN-SMP) Expanded For Oshkosh 2019!

ANN Keeps Pushing Aviation Media (Kicking and Screaming) Further Into The 21st Century... ANN is, again, radically updating its social media campaign for the upcoming 2019 Oshkosh >[...]

Don't Miss This! 2019 AirVenture Innovation Preview Is Open To Space Requests

Over Half The Possible Feature Slots For the 2019 AIP Are Already Reserved... DON'T MISS OUT ON THIS? Important Update: The 2019 AirVenture Innovation Preview roster is filling up >[...]

Airborne 06.17.19: Riley Flies!, An-124s Ordered Seized, Contaminated Fuel

Also: FAA Revokes, SAIB For Collins Pro Line, EAA Chapter 534 Scholarship, AAR Airlift Penalized Some times... we forget what this aviation gig is all about... we get so wrapped up>[...]

AMA Drone Report 06.13.19: UK Drone Protest, New Amazon UAV, SafeAir Mavic

Also: Drone Safety At UAS Symposium, Microsoft FlightSim, Urban Air Mobility, Drone Airspace Webinar Model airplane pilots in the UK are taking issue with proposed drone regulation>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2019 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC