Gates Says KC-X May Be Resurrected By Spring | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

** Airborne 09.15.14 ** HD iPad-Friendly -- Airborne 09.15.14 **
** Airborne 09.12.14 ** HD iPad-Friendly -- Airborne 09.12.14 **
** Airborne 09.10.14 ** HD iPad-Friendly -- Airborne 09.10.14 **

Thu, Jan 29, 2009

Gates Says KC-X May Be Resurrected By Spring

USAF May Just Get A New Tanker After All...

The procurement by the US Air Force of a new aerial tanker, tentatively dubbed KC-X, has turned into a protracted political battle involving Boeing, Northrop Grumman and EADS.

Last year, the Northrop-EADS team won the $35 billion competition, but that contract award was challenged by Boeing, the Government Accountability Office agreed, and a new competition was ordered.

Then, amid concerns the service wasn't prepared to conduct the competition successfully, US Defense Secretary Robert Gates moved in July to strip the Air Force of oversight, handing control of the process off to John Young, a defense undersecretary in charge of procurement. Then, in September, concerned the process would still be open to challenges regardless who won the contract, Gates postponed the bidding indefinitely.

Now, the Seattle Post-Intelligencer reports that Gates, who's been kept on a Secretary of Defense in the Obama administration, is getting ready to try again. Gates told Congress Tuesday that once a new deputy defense secretary and a new chief weapons buyer have been confirmed, he hopes to restart the process this spring, and award a contract by early in 2010.

While a resurgence in "buy American" sentiment might favor Boeing, Northrop makes strong arguments for why its Airbus-based tanker, which would undergo final assembly in Alabama, is just as American as Boeing 767-based proposal. One of those reasons is that both planes share key subcontractors, in much the same way that "American" automobiles usually have greater foreign content than manufacturers let on.

"While Boeing's 767 is assembled in Seattle, WA from parts built in Japan, Italy, UK and Canada, Northrop Grumman's tanker would be assembled in Mobile, AL, built from parts produced in NATO countries -- UK, Spain, Germany and France," Northrop notes.

In the end, that public relations effort is a political subtlety. By treaty, the Pentagon is required to give contractors based in NATO countries, and the employment they create, the same weight as US contractors...

Though as we saw the last time around, jingoistic concerns have a way of intruding in that process nevertheless.

FMI: www.af.mil

Advertisement

More News

Airborne 09.12.14: Alan Klapmeier's $10M Win, OWW Progress, 3rd Class Update

Also: Zero-G Engine Repo, Collier Trophy, EAA Addresses FAA Hangar Use, CAF's Dallas Air Expo While it comes as no surprise to those of us that have had to deal with Cirrus Aircraf>[...]

Klyde Morris (09.15.14)

Klyde May Set A Record For The Number of People He's Gonna Tick Off With This One... FMI: www.klydemorris.com>[...]

Aero-News: Quote Of The Day (09.15.14)

“Our team organized the WWII Air Expo as a way to thank residents for welcoming the CAF to North Texas. We will fill the Dallas sky with the largest fleet of World War II bom>[...]

AeroSports Update: WhatÂ’s The Difference Between FAA And ASTM Approved Aircraft?

Sport Pilots Have A Choice Of Flying An Airplane That Is Built To FAA Standards Or To ASTM Standards, And It Helps To Understand The Difference Whether an airplane is built to FAA >[...]

Airbus Celebrates 20 Years Of The 'Beluga'

Flight Hours Per Aircraft Have Doubled Since First Flight In 1994 With its maiden flight on September 13, 1994, the popular Beluga cargo aircraft, affectionately named after the wh>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2014 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC