TSA Misses Deadline To Finalize Repair Station Security Rule | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Most Recent Daily Airborne

Airborne On ANN

Airborne On YouTube/Hi-Def/Mac Friendly

Monday

Airborne 01.26.15

Airborne 01.26.15

Tuesday

Airborne 01.27.15

Airborne 01.27.15

Wednesday

Airborne 01.28.15

Airborne 01.28.15

Thursday

Airborne 01.29.15

Airborne 01.29.15

Friday

Airborne 01.30.15

Airborne 01.30.15

Sun, Jun 16, 2013

TSA Misses Deadline To Finalize Repair Station Security Rule

Rule Has Been Under A 90-Day Examination Period By OMB

ARSA says the TSA once again failed to meet its deadline to finalize the repair station security rule, expected by Thursday. TSA’s inaction means the FAA still faces a moratorium on certificating foreign aviation repair stations, an issue for the industry since 2008.

During a March 14 oversight hearing before the House Transportation Security Subcommittee, TSA Administrator John Pistole confirmed that the rule was under a mandatory 90-day examination period by the Office of Management & Budget after work was completed by TSA and the Department of Homeland Security. In response, The Aeronautical Repair Station Association (ARSA) is now working with Congress to resolve the issue.

“Time after time TSA misses its deadlines and the only ones paying the price are aviation maintenance companies seeking to expand internationally,” said Christian A. Klein, ARSA’s executive vice president. “We have maintained from the beginning that mandating repair station security rules were a solution in search of a problem. TSA’s inaction after nearly a decade shows that security was never truly an issue.”

“The aviation maintenance industry is done sitting by and hoping the government will follow Congress’ ill-advised directive – we’re taking action to ensure our businesses can build and grow their markets,” said ARSA Vice President of Government Affairs Daniel B. Fisher. “The ban is costing U.S. companies millions of dollars in lost revenues, stifling domestic growth and job creation that would support overseas expansion. Congress created this problem and now it should fix it”

In 2003, Congress first mandated TSA finalize repair station security rules. After years of inaction, in 2007, lawmakers once again required the agency to complete work on the regulations, prohibiting the FAA from approving new foreign repair stations after Aug. 3, 2008 if TSA didn’t comply.

FMI: http://arsa.org/

Advertisement

More News

Citizen Scientists Lead Astronomers To Mystery Objects In Space

'Yellow Balls' Discovered By Volunteers Studying Spitzer Images Sometimes it takes a village to find new and unusual objects in space. Volunteers scanning tens of thousands of star>[...]

Aero-News: Quote Of The Day (02.01.15)

"While this star formed a long time ago, in fact before most of the stars in the Milky Way, we have no indication that any of these planets have now or ever had life on them. At th>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Term (02.01.15): Final Approach Fix

Final Approach Fix The fix from which the final approach (IFR) to an airport is executed and which identifies the beginning of the final approach segment. It is designated on Gover>[...]

Air Ambulance Market Size, Vendor Landscape Analyzed In New Report

New Global Air Ambulance Research Report Shows Projected Growth Of Nearly Ten Percent The Global Air Ambulance market is expected to grow at a CAGR (Compound Annual Growth Rate) of>[...]

US Navy Approves F/A-18 IRST System For Production

Long-Range Sensor System Demonstrated Production Readiness On Super Hornet The F/A-18 Super Hornet infrared search and track (IRST) system, developed and integrated by Boeing and L>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2015 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC