NASA Rocket Mission Carrying University Student Experiments | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

** Airborne 04.18.14--CLICK HERE! ** HD iPad-Friendly Version--Airborne 04.18.14 **
** Airborne 04.16.14--CLICK HERE! ** HD iPad-Friendly Version--Airborne 04.16.14 **
** Airborne 04.14.14--CLICK HERE! ** HD iPad-Friendly Version--Airborne 04.14.14 **

Tue, Aug 21, 2012

NASA Rocket Mission Carrying University Student Experiments

Launch On Suborbital Sounding Rocket Scheduled For August 23

University students will put their academic skills to the test when atmospheric and technology experiments they developed fly on a NASA suborbital sounding rocket. The launch will take place between 0630 and 1000 EDT, Thursday, Aug. 23, from the agency's Wallops Flight Facility at Wallops Island, VA.

Four university experiments will be flown as part of an educational project called RockSat-X, which is designed to provide students hands-on experience in designing, fabricating, testing and conducting experiments for space flight. The project is a joint effort between NASA and the Colorado Space Grant Consortium at the University of Colorado at Boulder. The selected experiments for this year's RockSat launch are from Baylor University in Waco, TX; University of Colorado at Boulder; the University of Puerto Rico; and Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech) in Blacksburg, VA.

"RockSat-X is part of a series of student flight programs designed to enhance students' skills and prepare them for careers at NASA and in the aerospace industry," said Chris Koehler, director of the Colorado Space Grant Consortium.

The program begins with a hands-on workshop called RockOn and then proceeds to the RockSat-C and RockSat-X programs. At each level, the experiments become more complex, which provides students an opportunity to gain a greater understanding of the requirements for developing space-based experiments. The experiments will fly on a two-stage Terrier-Improved Malemute rocket to a projected altitude of 98 miles. After the 15-minute flight, the payload carrying the experiments will splash down via parachute in the Atlantic Ocean approximately 66 miles off the coast of Virginia. The 875-pound payload will be recovered for re-use and experiment analysis.

The University of Puerto Rico will use a mass spectrometer to conduct an analysis of atmospheric particles and pressure. Virginia Tech and Baylor universities have teamed up to measure nitric oxide and atmospheric dust. The University of Colorado will be testing a device to assist in de-orbiting small spacecraft and the Colorado Space Grant Consortium will fly seven cameras to capture all the action in high-definition, which will be made available to the public shortly after recovery.

The RockSat-X concept provides students with a payload structure with pre-defined mechanical, power and data interfaces and volume and mass limits. This is the second RockSat-X mission, with the first having been flown July 11, 2011. The project will be the ninth suborbital rocket mission this year from NASA's launch facility on Wallops Island and the first of four launches scheduled through mid-September.

(File image sounding rocket launch from Wallops)

FMI: http://spacegrant.colorado.edu/rockon/

Advertisement

More News

Aero-News: Quote Of The Day (04.20.14)

"The discovery of Kepler-186f is a significant step toward finding worlds like our planet Earth. Future NASA missions, like the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite and the James >[...]

Skydive Jersey Announces Shuttle Service For 2014 Season

Removes 'Getting To The Airport' As An Excuse To Not Go Skydiving So imagine it's a beautiful day to go jump out of an airplane in the greater New York City area, but you just don'>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Term (04.20.14): Ground Stop

Ground Stop Ground Stops are implemented for a number of reasons. The most common reasons are: 1) To control air traffic volume to airports when the projected traffic demand is exp>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Linx (04.20.14)

Aero Linx: The Australian Parachute Federation The Australian Parachute Federation exists to administer and represent Australian Sport Parachuting. This is achieved by promoting an>[...]

ANN FAQ: Getting The Most Out Of ANN's Newsletters

ANN goes through a lot of trouble to make the graphics flashy and cool and an integral part of the story. But let's face it, they're bandwidth-intensive. So here are a couple of th>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2014 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC