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Fri, Dec 14, 2018

Make Sure Laser-Light Displays Aren't Aimed at the Sky

Civil Penalties Could Be Imposed Against Homeowners

With the holiday season upon us, the FAA wants to make sure your laser-light displays are aimed at your house and not into the sky.

Each year the FAA receives reports from pilots who are distracted or temporarily blinded by residential laser-light displays. You might not realize this, but a well-meaning attempt to spread holiday cheer has the potential to create a serious safety risk to pilots and their passengers flying overhead.

So please make sure all laser lights are directed at your house and not into the sky. The extremely concentrated beams of laser lights reach much farther than you might realize.

If the FAA becomes aware that your laser-light display affects pilots, they say they will ask you to adjust them or turn them off. If your laser-light display continues to affect pilots, despite the warnings, you could face a civil penalty.

Laser strikes against aircraft continue to increase each year. Last year the FAA received 6,754 reports of laser strikes against aircraft, a 250 percent increase since the agency started tracking laser strikes in 2010.

Intentionally aiming a laser at an aircraft is a serious safety risk and violates federal law. Many high-powered lasers can completely incapacitate pilots who are trying to fly safely to their destinations and may be carrying hundreds of passengers.

The FAA works with federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies to pursue civil and criminal penalties against individuals who purposely aim a laser at an aircraft. We may impose civil penalties of up to $11,000 per violation. Civil penalties of up to $30,800 have been imposed by the FAA against individuals for multiple laser incidents.

(Image provided with FAA news release)

FMI: www.faa.gov

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