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Tue, Jan 22, 2013

Richard Bach Finishes His Best-Known Work

Completed Fourth Part Of 'Johnathan Livingston Seagull' While Recovering From Airplane Accident

The accident which reportedly nearly killed him has at least in part inspired author Richard Bach to complete what is certainly his best-known work.

Bach (pictured) was seriously injured in an accident in his Easton SeaRey amphibious airplane August 31st. He hit some powerlines flying near Friday Harbor Airport and went down. Bach had to be airlifted to Harborview Medical Center in Seattle. He suffered brain injuries which affected his ability to perform basic things like walking and speaking. He and his doctors credit the medical airlift with saving the author's life, and he has helped establish the "Gift of Wings" fund for Harborview, and Airlift Northwest, which transported him to the hospital, according to a report appearing in the Seattle Times.

While recovering, with his ex-wife Sabryna Bach his almost constant companion, the 76-year-old author has written the final chapters in his inspirational story and international best-seller "Johnathan Livingston Seagull" and sent it to the printers. Bach told the Times that the story was originally conceived in four parts, and he completed only three. In the fourth part of the novella, Johnathan goes from an object of worship on the part of the flock to a myth, but then represents a "message of hope" when he returns to the flock.

Rob Bach, one of Richard's sons, told the paper he would like to see his father flying again. He said the family plans to rebuild the SeaRey, but Richard said it was too soon to know whether he would ever fly his airplane, nicknamed "Puff," again.

FMI: http://richardbach.com/

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