NTSB ID's Origin Of JAL Boeing 787 Battery Fire | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

AMA Drone Report

Airborne-Monday

Airborne-Tuesday

Airborne-Wednesday

Airborne-Thursday

Airborne-Friday

Airborne-Unmanned w/AUVSI

Airborne On ANN

AMA 06.22.17

Airborne 06.26.17

Airborne 06.27.17

Airborne 06.28.17

Airborne 06.22.17

Airborne 06.23.17

Airborne-Unmanned 06.27.17

Airborne-YouTube

AMA 06.22.17

Airborne 06.26.17

Airborne 06.27.17

Airborne 06.28.17

Airborne 06.22.17

Airborne 06.23.17

Airborne-Unmanned 06.27.17

XPONENTIAL Innovation Preview -- www.allthingsunmanned.com

Thu, Feb 07, 2013

NTSB ID's Origin Of JAL Boeing 787 Battery Fire

Design, Certification And Manufacturing Processes Come Under Scrutiny 

At a news conference today, NTSB Chairman Deborah A.P. Hersman identified the origin of the Jan. 7 battery fire that occurred on a Japan Airlines 787 parked at Boston Logan Airport, and said that a focus of the investigation will be on the design and certification requirements of the battery system.

"U.S. airlines carry about two million people through the skies safely every day, which has been achieved in large part through design redundancy and layers of defense," said Hersman. "Our task now is to see if enough - and appropriate - layers of defense and adequate checks were built into the design, certification and manufacturing of this battery."

After an exhaustive examination of the JAL lithium-ion battery, which was comprised of eight individual cells, investigators determined that the majority of evidence from the flight data recorder and both thermal and mechanical damage pointed to an initiating event in a single cell. That cell showed multiple signs of short circuiting, leading to a thermal runaway condition, which then cascaded to other cells. Charred battery components indicated that the temperature inside the battery case exceeded 500 degrees Fahrenheit.

As investigators work to find the cause of the initiating short circuit, they ruled out both mechanical impact damage to the battery and external short circuiting. It was determined that signs of deformation and electrical arcing on the battery case occurred as a result of the battery malfunction and were not related to its cause.

Chairman Hersman said that potential causes of the initiating short circuit currently being evaluated include battery charging, the design and construction of the battery, and the possibility of defects introduced during the manufacturing process.

During the 787 certification process, Boeing studied possible failures that could occur within the battery. Those assessments included the likelihood of particular types of failures occurring, as well as the effects they could have on the battery. In tests to validate these assessments, Boeing found no evidence of cell-to-cell propagation or fire, both of which occurred in the JAL event.

The NTSB learned that as part of the risk assessment Boeing conducted during the certification process, it determined that the likelihood of a smoke emission event from a 787 battery would occur less than once in every 10 million flight hours. Noting that there have been two critical battery events on the 787 fleet with fewer than 100,000 flight hours, Hersman said that "the failure rate was higher than predicted as part of the certification process and the possibility that a short circuit in a single cell could propagate to adjacent cells and result in smoke and fire must be reconsidered."

As the investigation continues, which will include testing on some of the batteries that had been replaced after being in service in the 787 fleet, the NTSB will continue to share its findings in real time with the FAA, Boeing, the Japan Transport Safety Board, and the French investigative agency, the Bureau d'Enquêtes et d'Analyses.

"The decision to return the fleet to flight will be made by the FAA, which underscores the importance of cooperation and coordination between our agencies," Hersman said.

She also announced that the NTSB would release an interim report of factual findings within 30 days.

FMI: www.ntsb.gov, www.twitter.com/ntsb

Advertisement

More News

ANN's 2017 AirVenture Innovation Preview is Going To Be A Stunner!

Early Confirmations Show An Amazing Assortment of Exciting New Products and Technologies! It may be the most impressive line-up of new technology to ever be featured in our Innovat>[...]

Airborne 06.27.17: SpaceX Doubles!, Sean Tucker Retirement, FA Changes

Also: Shoreham Update, Aero-Calendar, AUVSI, Fighter Pilots, André Borschberg, Airport Crimes, Drone Conference SpaceX, in the midst of a greatly accelerated launch pace, pu>[...]

Airborne-Unmanned 06.27.17: AUVSI On Senate Bill, Intel Olympics, NIGHTWARDEN

Also: DRL Winner $$, Kespry Enters Insurance Sector, Drone Sim Market, Automated Vehicles Symposium Brian Wynne, president and CEO of AUVSI, issued a statement on the unmanned airc>[...]

AMA Drone Report 06.22.17: FAA Reauthorization, Rotor Riot Int'l, DRL on ESPN

Also: Drones at Oshkosh!, Drone Regulatory Effort, AMA Drone Report-Help Wanted, Aero-TV: MultiGP Drone Racing The House of Representatives has published initial language to reauth>[...]

U.S. Rocketry Students Impress At Internationals, Win Gold

Students From Festus, MO Become Third Consecutive U.S. Team To Take Top Spot The 10-student team from Festus High School in Festus, MO bested the world's best rocketry teams and to>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2017 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC