Report: Research Needed On In-Flight Air | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Airborne On ANN

Airborne 12.05.16

Airborne 12.06.16

Airborne 11.30.16

Airborne 12.01.16

Airborne 12.02.16

Airborne Hi-Def On YouTube

Airborne 12.05.16

Airborne 12.06.16

Airborne 11.30.16

Airborne 12.01.16

Airborne 12.02.16

Thu, Feb 12, 2004

Report: Research Needed On In-Flight Air

Congress Says Cabin Air Poses Health Risks

The FAA isn't doing enough to find out whether people are more likely to catch the flu or other diseases when they fly, a congressional report said Tuesday. The report by the General Accounting Office recommended more research into the health effects of the dry, recirculated air inside commercial airplanes. Many suspect that airplane air causes upper respiratory illnesses.

"It would be hard to find an airline passenger who has never come down with a cold or a sore throat and runny nose after flying," Rep. Peter DeFazio, the Oregon Democrat who requested the report, said in a statement.

In 2001, a scientific panel recommended that the FAA collect more data about cabin air. The FAA agreed to lead a research program to determine the accuracy of perceptions that air circulated inside airplanes causes discomfort or illness. The GAO, Congress's investigative arm, said in its report that the FAA's research plans are too limited.

"FAA has not yet developed a detailed plan with key milestones and funding estimates for conducting the planned surveillance and research program," the report said.

FAA spokeswoman Alison Duquette said past research has generally shown that airplane air is cleaner than the air in most homes and offices. She said the FAA, though, is funding several studies, including one to monitor air inside passenger aircraft cabins. "It's a recurring concern that passengers and flight attendants have," Duquette said. "We are pursuing doing actual data collection aboard aircraft."

Currently, about 85 percent of large airliners use hospital-grade filters — called high-efficiency particulate air filters — which health experts say is the best way to protect passengers from viruses and bacteria, the report said. A smaller percent of planes that carry fewer than 100 passengers use the filters, the GAO said.

FMI: www.faa.gov

Advertisement

More News

Airborne 12.05.16: AutoGyro Certified, Police Seize Drone, GoPro Job Cuts

Also: Aldrin Evacuated, Shark US, Lufthansa, NASA, ESA's New Orbiter, FLIR Systems, Esterline The expression, “breaking news,” seems to be highly overused nowadays, but>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Linx (12.06.16)

Closing Santa Monica Airport: Something Does Not Add Up The latest update from the the Santa Monica Airport pointing out the reasons that the arguments for closing the airport "don>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Term (12.06.16): Clutter

In radar operations, clutter refers to the reception and visual display of radar returns caused by precipitation, chaff, terrain, numerous aircraft targets, or other phenomena.>[...]

Aero-News: Quote of the Day (12.06.16)

"Regardless of our appreciation of the public policy arguments raised by opponents, we have been advised that the law and our bilateral obligations leave us no avenue to reject thi>[...]

ANN FAQ: How To Get YOUR News Out On Aero-News

Good News, Bad News... It's ALL News As the preeminent online aviation news resource out there, the editorial staff at Aero-News sees a large number of news releases. We look at al>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2016 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC