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Aero-TV: Safety Tip of the Week - The Emergency Vision Assurance System

CEO/Captain John Cox Explains a Simple Solution for a Complex Problem

According to the Airline Pilots Association, there are an average of three smoke incidents daily in the United States.  In all, one out of every third emergency landing is due to smoke. Reports indicate that smoke is the leading defined cause of emergency landings for extended Twin-Engine Operations aircraft; dense smoke in a cockpit renders essential flight instrument panels useless if they are unable to be seen.

EVAS, or the Emergency Vision Assurance System, provides pilots with a simple, yet crucial solution during critical situations:  a straightforward device that provides a clear space of air through which a pilot can read instruments and out the front windshield for safe landing.  At a mere 3x8.5x10 inches when stowed, the system becomes fully functional in less than 30 seconds once a pilot has removed a small tab to activate the unit.  Once inflated, by placing smoke goggles against the EVAS system’s clear window, the pilot is able to see both vital flight instruments and windshield views unobstructed.

Clear vision is maintained through EVAS' state-of-the-art pressurization system that uses filtered cockpit air to uphold consistent volume.  Running on a self-contained battery supply independent of aircraft power, the EVAS system is designed to run for at least two hours to provide ample time for safe emergency landing. 

Several major companies, including Bombardier, Dassault, and Gulfstream Aerospace have implemented the EVAS system as a standard option for their line of business aircraft.

FMI: www.evasworldwide.com/index.php, www.aero-tv.net, www.youtube.com/aerotvnetwork, http://twitter.com/AeroNews

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