Spirit Kicks Into High Gear | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Most Recent Daily Airborne

Airborne On ANN

Airborne On YouTube/Hi-Def/Mac Friendly

Monday

Airborne 01.26.15

Airborne 01.26.15

Tuesday

Airborne 01.27.15

Airborne 01.27.15

Wednesday

Airborne 01.28.15

Airborne 01.28.15

Thursday

Airborne 01.29.15

Airborne 01.29.15

Friday

Airborne 01.30.15

Airborne 01.30.15

Thu, Feb 12, 2004

Spirit Kicks Into High Gear

Rover Sets Mars One-Day Distance Record   

The Spirit rover shattered a one-day distance record on Mars, rolling nearly 70 feet across the planet's rocky surface, NASA said Tuesday. The drive covered more than three times the greatest distance that NASA's tiny Sojourner rover ever traveled in a day on its own 1997 mission to Mars, mission manager Jim Erickson said.

"The basic goal was to drive as far as they could and see how things went in the time that they had," Erickson said of the drive, which ended late Monday without any problems. "Everything seemed to go fine there. Tomorrow's plan is further driving. The day after that is driving even further," Erickson told reporters by telephone.

Spirit drove "blind" about half the distance, following a planned route to a stopping point. For the second half of the short trip, the rover drove to a second stopping point, autonomously executed a turn, and then rolled onward before stopping, Erickson said.

NASA has sent Spirit toward a crater nicknamed "Bonneville" that sits about 800 feet from where the spacecraft landed. NASA hopes the six-wheeled rover eventually will cover as much as 140 feet a day, Erickson said.

Spirit's twin, Opportunity, also was on the move at its landing site, halfway around the planet. Opportunity continued to "scoot and shoot" along an outcrop, driving along the rock formation while taking detailed pictures of the finely layered rocks. Initial results suggest the rocks formed from volcanic ash or compacted, windblown dust.

NASA sent the pair of rovers on an $820 million mission to look for geologic evidence that Mars was once a wetter place that might have been hospitable to life.

FMI: http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov

Advertisement

More News

Airborne 01.30.15: SpaceShipTwo Test Update, Google Lunar, CAF Hall Of Fame

Also: XL-2 Returns, DJI Disables, Barnstorming On Aero-Community, Prop STC, Elon Musk, Mars-Copter Since its inception, Virgin Galactic has worked with Scaled Composites to build a>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Linx (01.31.15)

Association of Air Medical Services The Association of Air Medical Services (AAMS), based in Alexandria, Va., is the only trade association serving the entire air and ground medica>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Term (01.31.15): No Gyro Approach

A radar approach/vector provided in case of a malfunctioning gyro-compass or directional gyro.>[...]

Aero-News: Quote Of The Day (01.31.15)

“I’m grateful to my staff, many supporters, suppliers and the Heriot Watt Research Park team who are here to celebrate our official opening today." Source: Trig Avionic>[...]

ANN FAQ: ANN's News Portal Syndication Program

Get A Customized ANN News Portal For YOUR Website! As we promised, the ever-so-busy software geeks at ANN have been working overtime on a number of cool new tools and toys... and t>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2015 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC